When is a Goose not a Goose?

Holiday in Hawaii #10

When is a goose not a goose?

When it’s a mongoose of course.

During our lunch break at Wai’anapanapa State Park on the Road to Hana, we had the feeling we were being watched. We spotted movement near the stone wall, but the creature moved so fast we missed him at first. So we sat very still and waited, and out he came again.

mongoose

He surveyed the scene carefully before venturing out in search of food, but quickly darted back into the gap in the rock wall when people came too close.

mongoose

mongoose

Mongooses were imported into the islands of Hawaii in the 1800s to reduce the rat population in the sugar cane fields. Unfortunately, they took a liking to the native ground nesting birds and devoured them as well as the rats. The only Hawaiian island that doesn’t have mongooses is Kauai; the story goes that when a delivery of mongooses was being unloaded of a ship in Kauai, a mongoose bit the hand of a worker. He was enraged and threw all the cages into the ocean. As a result, Kauai has a much larger bird population than any other island.

Visit Jude’s Garden Challenge this month to see more animals in gardens.

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18 thoughts on “When is a Goose not a Goose?

  1. Stunning photos Carol. The only time I have seen a mongoose was in Africa, and I think they were Banded Mongoose which are striped. They all look very much like Meerkats too.

  2. Never knew that Kauai was the only island without the mongoose. Always learn something from your posts. I have been there several times, but have never seen the mongoose. Great pictures. Really enjoying your Hawaii posts. Thanks for sharing.

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