Roaming in Roma

Close to home #14 Roma

It’s always lovely to go on a long holiday to a far flung destination. There are times, however, when it’s not convenient or cost effective and a staycation closer to home is the way to go. The destinations in this series of posts are all just a few hours’ drive from our home. They’re easy to get to, there’s plenty to see and do and at the end of the holiday we’re home again in no time.

The western Queensland town of Roma is located more than 500 kilometres from the ocean and the landscape is often parched from lack of rain. But at Bungil Creek and the Railway Dams there are gentle walkways with water views and, after good spring rainfall, the area is beautifully green. In both locations, it’s all about the trees.

A huge bottle tree marks the start of the Adungadoo Pathway, which follows the course of Bungil Creek. Said to be the largest in the district, the tree measures more than nine metres around the trunk and is thought to be at least 100 years old.

Even older are the river red gums on the creek bank. Some have been dated to 400 years and, along with tall coolabah trees, provide shade for walkers and cyclists. In spring, birds are attracted to the golden flowers of the silky oaks.

There are places to rest along the pathway, but there’s also the chance to be more active.  The frisbee course, similar to a golf course, has baskets instead of holes and a par for each round. A gym circuit has exercise equipment suitable for all abilities.

In the past, there was also a lot of activity at the Railway Dams. Originally built in the 19th century to supply water for passing steam trains, the dams are now surrounded by the Roma Bush Gardens. Eleven distinct areas are planted with native trees and flowering plants found in the surrounding Maranoa region.

A circular walkway passes through all the gardens, past more river red gums and coolabah, brigalow and belah trees. Bottlebrush shrubs laden with red blossoms grow at the water’s edge.

Walkers aren’t the only ones attracted to Bungil Creek and the Bush Garden. Rainbow lorikeets and kookaburras perch high in the river red gums and blue-faced honeyeaters dart around the flowering bushes. Pacific black ducks and swamp hens forage at water level.

 Even on the hottest and driest of days in Roma, the walking paths beside Bungil Creek and the Railway Dams are cool and shaded.
Join Jo for more Monday Walks
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40 thoughts on “Roaming in Roma

  1. Have always loved the name of kookaburras, but now I have learnt of Rainbow lorikeets I might just have to make that even more of a favourite as it looks gorgeous too!

  2. Goodness, that’s some tree you started out with, Carol! 🙂 🙂 I have a soft spot for the bottle brushes. We have quite a few on our estate in the Algarve. Many thanks for the link up, hon!

  3. I hate to say it but Waltzing Matilda has a lot to blame for making me an Australiaphile all those years ago – how can one resist words like ‘under the shade of the coolabah tree’? Love all the trees in this post, the bottle tree is superb and I always like a bottlebrush. This looks like a fabulous place for a stroll with all the birds and nature. Nice one Carol. Thank you 🙂

  4. Pingback: Jo’s Monday walk : Loitering in LOULÉ | restlessjo

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