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Hidden Remnants

Australian Landscapes #35
Destination: Kilkivan, Queensland

Copper was first discovered in the area west of Gympie in the 1870s, at a time when it was selling for up to £95 a ton. The value of the ore more than compensated for the remote location and difficult terrain, and several mines and smelters were quickly established around the base of Mount Clara.

But after such a successful beginning, the mines were closed by the end of the decade and the hundreds of men employed by the companies had moved on.

All that remains to show for their effort is a hand built stone chimney surrounded by the ruins of a smelter which once processed ore from the mines. Thought to be one of the first of its kind and also the oldest surviving mining chimney in Queensland, it is now listed on the state’s Heritage Register.

Built in 1872, the Mount Clara smelter chimney was constructed of local bluestone and mortar made with sand from Fraser Island. The skill of the stonemasons is evident in the intricacy of their work, with stones of varying shapes and sizes neatly placed together. Iron bands, although rusted with age, still provide support for the chimney’s walls.

Did the stonemasons work with the stones in their natural state, building the chimney as if they were assembling a puzzle? Or did they deliberately create the unusual shapes to give extra strength to the structure?

We’ll never know.

Islands in the Sun

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #30

Destination: Whitsunday Islands, Queensland

If you’re in search of a tropical paradise, look no further than the Whitsunday Islands, an archipelago of 74 islands located between Queensland’s central coast and the Great Barrier Reef. Surrounded by the clear blue waters of the Coral Sea, some of the islands are home to luxury resorts, but many are uninhabited.

The island group was named in 1770 by James Cook while on his first voyage of discovery. He thought he sailed past on Whit Sunday, without realising he had already crossed what would one day be known as the International Date Line.

That slight miscalculation isn’t going to worry anyone who’s enjoying an tropical island holiday in the Whitsundays.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

A Natural Balancing Act

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #26

Destination: Stonehenge Recreational Reserve, New South Wales

At Stonehenge Recreational Reserve it looks like a giant tossed his pebble collection like a little boy tosses marbles. Beside the New England Highway not far from Glen Innes, dozens of huge granite boulders lie scattered across 32 hectares of parkland. Some are only just exposed, with most of their massive bulk still buried underground. Others rest on their side or stack up against each other.

Some boulders balance haphazardly in precarious positions,

while others seem perilously close to toppling.

When the first English settlers arrived here in 1838, they named their property “Stonehenge”. It’s not hard to imagine why.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

No Mystery Here

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #20

Destination: Glen Innes, New South Wales

Standing stones, with their mysterious origins and unknown purpose, have attracted people for centuries. Most were placed in position thousands of years ago by communities long since disappeared.

The Australian Standing Stones in Glen Innes are neither mysterious nor ancient and their purpose is well documented. This monument acknowledges Celtic peoples around the world and is dedicated to migrants of Celtic origins who have made Australia their home.

The stone circle, inspired by the Ring of Brodgar in the Orkney Islands, is located in Centennial Park and is freely accessible to all. Completed in 1992, this stone circle has one thing in common with more ancient ones. The placement of the stones is significant, although this time the thoughts of the circle builders have been recorded for posterity.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

Repurposed

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #19

Destination: Deepwater, New South Wales

Away from the coastal fringe Australia’s vast inland was once dominated by the railways, as townships big and small relied upon trains to carry mail, produce and people across huge distances. Railway stations all along the train network connected the nation’s capital cities to regional and rural areas. With the growth of road transport in the second half of the 20th century, many inland railway lines ceased to be profitable and the stations along the tracks fell into disuse.

Deepwater Railway Station on the Main Northern Line opened in 1886, servicing the Northern Tablelands town of Deepwater and the surrounding rural district.

After earlier being one of the busiest in northern New South Wales, the railway station closed in 1972 when the railway line shut down.

Some railway track still exists alongside the platform, and the water tank and pipes used to fill the steam engines with water have been left standing.

While no longer used for its original purpose, the building has been conserved and now houses the local radio station. It’s still keeping communities connected.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

Always Remembered

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #17

Destination: Canberra, Australian Capital Territory

In October and November 2018, the grounds of the Australian War Memorial in Canberra were transformed in a spectacular commemoration of the centenary of the end of World War One.

62,000 handcrafted poppies, created and donated by people from all around the world, spread across the lawns of the memorial in a sea of red.

Each unique poppy represented an Australian who died in the service of their country during the Great War.

At a time when Australia’s population was fewer than five million, a loss of 62,000 was immense.

Lest We Forget

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

Risen From the Ashes

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #16

Destination: Mount Stromlo Observatory, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory

On 18th January 2003 a firestorm raged through Canberra’s outer suburbs, destroying 470 homes and more than 70% of the ACT’s parks and farmland. One of the greatest losses occurred on Mount Stromlo where the Observatory, home of the Australian National University’s Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, was located. Five historic telescopes were destroyed along with several buildings including the research facilities. Only the visitors’ centre and cafe were left untouched.

Today little remains of the damage caused by the fire’s fury. The original dome still stands although it is no longer used.

The lost buildings have been replaced and the astronomers and scientists continue their valuable work, which is explained in displays at the visitors’ centre. Looking out over the city and its surrounds from the deck at the cafe, it’s hard to imagine the devastation caused by the fires on that January day.

 

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

Looking Down, Not Up

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #13

Destination: Rocky Hill, Goulburn, New South Wales

High atop a hill overlooking the regional city of Goulburn stands an imposing stone tower. Built in the 1920s and paid for by public subscription, the tower is a war memorial honouring local men and women who served in World War One.

Inside the tower, the ground floor contains an honour roll and a flame of remembrance, while from the upstairs windows there are beautiful views of the city and the surrounding countryside.

I found it difficult to look up at the tower as we walked along the path.

After seeing these signs, I was too busy looking out for danger.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

A Walk to Remember

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #11

Destination: Newcastle, New South Wales

It’s hard to imagine that the ANZAC landing at Gallipoli in Turkey and the multi-national mining company BHP would have anything in common, but the connection between the two goes all the way back to 1915.

The ANZAC forces, comprising troops from the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, landed on the shore at Gallipoli on 25 April 1915, in what was to be an eight month campaign with more than 8000 Australian casualties. In the same year BHP, which was founded as a mining company in the outback town of Broken Hill in 1885, opened their first steel works in Newcastle.

It was this connection between two Australian legends which led to the construction of the Newcastle Memorial Walk. Commemorating the 100th anniversary of the Gallipoli landing, the 450 metre memorial walk passes over Strzelecki Headland, linking Bar Beach and King Edward Park. 64 tonnes of steel, manufactured and paid for by BHP, were used in the construction of the walkway.

Half way along the path, a bridge passes over the cliffs near the top of the headland. It is here the ANZACs are remembered. Striking silhouettes of servicemen and women line each side of the bridge.

Cut from steel, they are engraved with the names of 4000 regional families whose loved ones served during World War One. Steel plaques on the bridge tell the stories of their service.

The Memorial Walk is a permanent reminder of the sacrifices made in 1915.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time. Also joining Jo’s Monday Walks.

Up, Down, Up

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #9

Destination: Tomaree Head, Shoal Bay, New South Wales

The sign said it was only a two kilometre walk, but it looked a long way up to the summit of Tomaree Head.

At first the track was easy going,

but soon the gentle incline was replaced by steps up to a cantilevered walkway leading through the trees and around the edge of the hill.

At the top our efforts were rewarded with expansive coastal views to the north and south.

Heading back downhill, we left the summit walk and turned onto another path. It led us up again to the Fort Tomaree gun emplacements, part of Australia’s coastal defences during the Second World War.

The guns were removed a long time ago, but the structures which housed them have been left behind.

It was easy to see why Tomaree Head was chosen as a strategic site. The views were spectacular.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time. Also joining Jo’s Monday Walks.