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A Passion for Waves

Kind Squares Photo Challenge #22 ~ Queensland: One of a Kind

Destination: Burleigh Heads

The Ocean View Circuit around Burleigh Headland ends at John Laws Park in the Gold Coast suburb of Burleigh Heads. Popular with both locals and visitors, the park is filled with 450 Norfolk Pines, some planted more than 80 years ago. They provide welcome shade for those who want to sit, relaxing and enjoying the beautiful outlook or watching surfers in the water below. 

Surfing has long been part of the beach culture at Burleigh Heads. The waters off the headland have attracted surfers for decades and the world’s first professional surfing competition, the Stubby Surf Classic, was held here in 1977. 

Even the picnic tables in the park celebrate Australia’s passion for surfing.

This month I’m joining in every day with Becky’s October Kind Square Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: most photos must be square and fit the theme word “kind”. Look for #kindasquare

Calm Waters

Kind Squares Photo Challenge #19 ~ Queensland: One of a Kind

Destination: Tallebudgera Creek, Gold Coast

The protected waters of Tallebudgera Creek have long been a favourite of Gold Coast holiday makers. Originating in the hinterland at Springbrook, the creek flows down the mountain range and through the Tallebudgera Valley for 25 kilometres before joining the Coral Sea between Burleigh Headland and Palm Beach. 

Tallebudgera is one of those places families return to year after year and many south eastern Queenslanders have fond memories of their first school camp beside the creek.

The sandy beach is perfect for picnics and the calm water is a haven for swimmers. It’s no surprise that the creek is popular with fishermen too – the name Tallebudgera means “good fishing” in the local indigenous language. 

This month I’m joining in every day with Becky’s October Kind Square Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: most photos must be square and fit the theme word “kind”. Look for #kindasquare

Brooklyn House

Kind Squares Photo Challenge #10 ~ Queensland: One of a Kind

Destination: Brooklyn House, Howard

Dame Annabelle Rankin earned her place in Queensland’s history with many notable achievements. She was the first Queensland woman elected to the Senate, the first female to head a federal government ministry and, in her role as High Commissioner to New Zealand, the first Australian woman to lead a foreign mission.

Annabelle also supported many community groups and charities. Her highest honour came in 1957 when she was appointed a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1957 for her political and public service.

Brooklyn House, in the small Wide Bay town of Howard, was the childhood home of Annabelle Rankin. The grand Queenslander-style home was built in 1890 for the Rankin family and remained in their ownership until 1969. It was left derelict for many years before being restored by new owners to its former glory.

Set in lush sub-tropical gardens, the house is surrounded by a wide shady veranda which provides protection from the harsh Queensland sun.

It’s the perfect spot to enjoy a delicious Devonshire Tea.

This month I’m joining in every day with Becky’s October Kind Square Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: most photos must be square and fit the theme word “kind”. Look for #kindasquare

Over The River

Kind Squares Photo Challenge #6 ~ Queensland: One of a Kind

Destination: Dickabram Bridge, Miva, Queensland

For a country bridge linking two small rural towns, Dickabram Bridge is an impressive sight. Located between Miva and Theebine, the steel truss bridge is 191 metres long and stands 23 metres above the Mary River.

The bridge opened in 1886 and carried both road and rail traffic between Dickabram and Kilkivan.  It’s one of two of this kind left in Australia and the oldest in Queensland, and has been heritage listed since 1992. Trains no longer travel along this route but the bridge is still open to road traffic, one way at a time.

There’s a reason why the bridge is so far above the Mary River. With a catchment of more than 7,000 square kilometres in an area of the Great Dividing Range with higher than average rainfall, the river is prone to flooding. Since records began in 1868, the riverbanks have been breached 83 times. Major flooding, when water levels reach 20 metres or more above normal, has occurred 20 times. Only once though has water covered the timber planking of the bridge.

Dickabram Bridge was built to last.

This month I’m joining in every day with Becky’s October Kind Square Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: most photos must be square and fit the theme word “kind”. Look for #kindasquare

A Nut By Another Name

Kind Squares Photo Challenge #5 ~ Queensland: One of a Kind

Destination: Bauple

Have you ever eaten a bauple nut? You’re probably shaking your head, but chances are you have and you didn’t even know it!

The trees on which the nuts grow are native to northern New South Wales and south eastern Queensland and were named by the local indigenous people who once lived in the region. Enterprising farmers began growing grafted trees as early as the 1860s and in the 1880s they were introduced to Hawaii, where they became one of the state’s most important crops. Today the nutritious nuts are grown commercially in 13 countries, in a global industry valued at more than one billion US dollars. The bauple nut is Australia’s only native food source grown in other countries.

Have you guessed which nut I’m talking about? The bauple nut, also called the Queensland nut, is most commonly known as the macadamia.

Original ungrafted bauple trees still grow on the slopes of Mt Bauple in the Fraser Coast region of Queensland, in a national park reserved for scientific study.

Three original trees also grow in the grounds of the Mt Bauple Museum in the nearby town of Bauple, which celebrates the famous nut in a festival each November.

Next time you pop a macadamia in your mouth, take a moment to remember all those trees growing wild on the slopes of Mt Bauple and the indigenous people who prized the nuts as a delicacy.

This month I’m joining in every day with Becky’s October Kind Square Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: most photos must be square and fit the theme word “kind”. Look for #kindasquare.

Hidden Remnants

Australian Landscapes #35
Destination: Kilkivan, Queensland

Copper was first discovered in the area west of Gympie in the 1870s, at a time when it was selling for up to £95 a ton. The value of the ore more than compensated for the remote location and difficult terrain, and several mines and smelters were quickly established around the base of Mount Clara.

But after such a successful beginning, the mines were closed by the end of the decade and the hundreds of men employed by the companies had moved on.

All that remains to show for their effort is a hand built stone chimney surrounded by the ruins of a smelter which once processed ore from the mines. Thought to be one of the first of its kind and also the oldest surviving mining chimney in Queensland, it is now listed on the state’s Heritage Register.

Built in 1872, the Mount Clara smelter chimney was constructed of local bluestone and mortar made with sand from Fraser Island. The skill of the stonemasons is evident in the intricacy of their work, with stones of varying shapes and sizes neatly placed together. Iron bands, although rusted with age, still provide support for the chimney’s walls.

Did the stonemasons work with the stones in their natural state, building the chimney as if they were assembling a puzzle? Or did they deliberately create the unusual shapes to give extra strength to the structure?

We’ll never know.

Islands in the Sun

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #30

Destination: Whitsunday Islands, Queensland

If you’re in search of a tropical paradise, look no further than the Whitsunday Islands, an archipelago of 74 islands located between Queensland’s central coast and the Great Barrier Reef. Surrounded by the clear blue waters of the Coral Sea, some of the islands are home to luxury resorts, but many are uninhabited.

The island group was named in 1770 by James Cook while on his first voyage of discovery. He thought he sailed past on Whit Sunday, without realising he had already crossed what would one day be known as the International Date Line.

That slight miscalculation isn’t going to worry anyone who’s enjoying an tropical island holiday in the Whitsundays.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

A Natural Balancing Act

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #26

Destination: Stonehenge Recreational Reserve, New South Wales

At Stonehenge Recreational Reserve it looks like a giant tossed his pebble collection like a little boy tosses marbles. Beside the New England Highway not far from Glen Innes, dozens of huge granite boulders lie scattered across 32 hectares of parkland. Some are only just exposed, with most of their massive bulk still buried underground. Others rest on their side or stack up against each other.

Some boulders balance haphazardly in precarious positions,

while others seem perilously close to toppling.

When the first English settlers arrived here in 1838, they named their property “Stonehenge”. It’s not hard to imagine why.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

No Mystery Here

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #20

Destination: Glen Innes, New South Wales

Standing stones, with their mysterious origins and unknown purpose, have attracted people for centuries. Most were placed in position thousands of years ago by communities long since disappeared.

The Australian Standing Stones in Glen Innes are neither mysterious nor ancient and their purpose is well documented. This monument acknowledges Celtic peoples around the world and is dedicated to migrants of Celtic origins who have made Australia their home.

The stone circle, inspired by the Ring of Brodgar in the Orkney Islands, is located in Centennial Park and is freely accessible to all. Completed in 1992, this stone circle has one thing in common with more ancient ones. The placement of the stones is significant, although this time the thoughts of the circle builders have been recorded for posterity.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

Repurposed

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #19

Destination: Deepwater, New South Wales

Away from the coastal fringe Australia’s vast inland was once dominated by the railways, as townships big and small relied upon trains to carry mail, produce and people across huge distances. Railway stations all along the train network connected the nation’s capital cities to regional and rural areas. With the growth of road transport in the second half of the 20th century, many inland railway lines ceased to be profitable and the stations along the tracks fell into disuse.

Deepwater Railway Station on the Main Northern Line opened in 1886, servicing the Northern Tablelands town of Deepwater and the surrounding rural district.

After earlier being one of the busiest in northern New South Wales, the railway station closed in 1972 when the railway line shut down.

Some railway track still exists alongside the platform, and the water tank and pipes used to fill the steam engines with water have been left standing.

While no longer used for its original purpose, the building has been conserved and now houses the local radio station. It’s still keeping communities connected.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.