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Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #23

Destination: Bulcock Beach, Caloundra, Sunshine Coast, Queensland

Life at the beach doesn’t stop when the sun goes down. In the middle of summer the evening air is balmy and the water is the perfect temperature.

As the eastern sky takes on a rosy sunset glow, friends and families gather for beach-side picnics.

In the west the sun sinks towards the horizon, laying down a gilt trail across the calm waters of Pumicestone Passage.

This is my favourite time of day at the beach.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

No Mystery Here

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #20

Destination: Glen Innes, New South Wales

Standing stones, with their mysterious origins and unknown purpose, have attracted people for centuries. Most were placed in position thousands of years ago by communities long since disappeared.

The Australian Standing Stones in Glen Innes are neither mysterious nor ancient and their purpose is well documented. This monument acknowledges Celtic peoples around the world and is dedicated to migrants of Celtic origins who have made Australia their home.

The stone circle, inspired by the Ring of Brodgar in the Orkney Islands, is located in Centennial Park and is freely accessible to all. Completed in 1992, this stone circle has one thing in common with more ancient ones. The placement of the stones is significant, although this time the thoughts of the circle builders have been recorded for posterity.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

Repurposed

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #19

Destination: Deepwater, New South Wales

Away from the coastal fringe Australia’s vast inland was once dominated by the railways, as townships big and small relied upon trains to carry mail, produce and people across huge distances. Railway stations all along the train network connected the nation’s capital cities to regional and rural areas. With the growth of road transport in the second half of the 20th century, many inland railway lines ceased to be profitable and the stations along the tracks fell into disuse.

Deepwater Railway Station on the Main Northern Line opened in 1886, servicing the Northern Tablelands town of Deepwater and the surrounding rural district.

After earlier being one of the busiest in northern New South Wales, the railway station closed in 1972 when the railway line shut down.

Some railway track still exists alongside the platform, and the water tank and pipes used to fill the steam engines with water have been left standing.

While no longer used for its original purpose, the building has been conserved and now houses the local radio station. It’s still keeping communities connected.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

A Walk to Remember

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #11

Destination: Newcastle, New South Wales

It’s hard to imagine that the ANZAC landing at Gallipoli in Turkey and the multi-national mining company BHP would have anything in common, but the connection between the two goes all the way back to 1915.

The ANZAC forces, comprising troops from the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, landed on the shore at Gallipoli on 25 April 1915, in what was to be an eight month campaign with more than 8000 Australian casualties. In the same year BHP, which was founded as a mining company in the outback town of Broken Hill in 1885, opened their first steel works in Newcastle.

It was this connection between two Australian legends which led to the construction of the Newcastle Memorial Walk. Commemorating the 100th anniversary of the Gallipoli landing, the 450 metre memorial walk passes over Strzelecki Headland, linking Bar Beach and King Edward Park. 64 tonnes of steel, manufactured and paid for by BHP, were used in the construction of the walkway.

Half way along the path, a bridge passes over the cliffs near the top of the headland. It is here the ANZACs are remembered. Striking silhouettes of servicemen and women line each side of the bridge.

Cut from steel, they are engraved with the names of 4000 regional families whose loved ones served during World War One. Steel plaques on the bridge tell the stories of their service.

The Memorial Walk is a permanent reminder of the sacrifices made in 1915.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time. Also joining Jo’s Monday Walks.

Solitude

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #10

Destination: Port Stephens Region, New South Wales

Shoal Bay

Salamander Bay

Salamander Bay

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

The Best Way to Ride

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #7

Destination: Stockton Sand Dunes, Port Stephens, New South Wales

When you first arrive at Stockton Sand Dunes, you could be forgiven for thinking you’d suddenly arrived in Egypt. The coastal vegetation is replaced by vast hills of pure white sand and a camel caravan passes a line of small pyramids bordering the dunes.

Covering 32 kilometres and reaching a height of more than 30 metres, the Stockton Sand Dunes are the largest in the southern hemisphere. The pyramids are relics of World War Two, part of a line of tank traps installed to protect Australia’s eastern coast from potential invaders. And the camels are one of the area’s most popular tourist attractions.

If camels don’t appeal there are other ways to enjoy the sand dunes. Four wheel drive vehicles and quad bikes are permitted on the dunes. Or just take a big piece of cardboard and make your own toboggan.

Cheap, easy and the most fun of all!

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

Everything You Could Want

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #4

Destination: Murray’s Craft Brewing Co, Bobs Farm Port Stephens, New South Wales

When you’re hungry and thirsty, Murray’s Craft Brewing Co on Nelson Bay Road is the place to be.

There’s plenty of beer on tap, along with local wines created by Port Stephens Winery. The restaurant has an extensive menu and the servings are generous and delicious.

After your cravings have been satisfied there’s room out on the grass for a friendly game,

which is sure to leave you feeling thirsty again.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

Size Does Matter

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #3

Destination: Shoal Bay, New South Wales

From the outside this building looked like any other holiday accommodation. And on the inside our holiday unit was quite normal.

But the balcony was a different matter. It was huge.

And so were the views of Shoal Bay, from Tomaree Head around to Nelson Head.

Across the water, the white sand of Jimmy’s Beach and the little town of Hawk’s Neck were clearly visible.

With so much to see, we could have stayed on the balcony all week!

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

From On High

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #1

Destination: Yamba, New South Wales

As he soars past Yamba Lighthouse, this paraglider might well be thinking he has the best view in Australia.

He sails over Clarence Headland

where the relentless pounding of the waves has shaped the rocky shore

towards the fine white sand of Yamba Beach and the crescent shaped Convent Beach beyond.

On this particular day, he’s probably right!

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

Street Art Outback Style

Western Queensland Road Trip #15 

Street art tells a story, and every outback town has a story to tell.

A mosaic shield on the Maranoa Regional Council building in Roma depicts the region’s rich history of agriculture and natural gas production.

Inside the building a much larger mosaic shows more detail: vineyards and wineries, gas fields, sheep and cattle farming, the road and rail routes which opened up the outback. Indigenous first peoples and industrious pioneers are featured along with those beautiful bottle trees Roma is famous for.

There’s no mistaking the purpose of these parking bays at the Roma Community Art Centre.

The wall around Roma’s Bassett Park has been transformed into a giant canvas. A mural 100 metres long details a day in the life of the Maranoa Region, from sunrise to sunset. Aboriginal art, local native plants and a rig on the oil and gas fields all feature on the panels. Most spectacular is the image of Carnarvon Gorge, with its rugged sandstone cliffs disappearing into the distance.

Just south of Mitchell, a cluster of dramatic red figures stands beside of the highway. The memorial pays homage to the local constabulary who, in the early 20th century, protected the district from the Kenniff brothers, the last of Australia’s notorious bushrangers. A nearby plaque tells the story of the crimes and final demise of the brothers.

On Wills Street in Charleville, Matilda the big kangaroo greets visitors with a friendly wave. With her bush hat on, a swag on her back and a joey in her pouch, she’s ready to hop away on a new adventure. Further down the street, a giant yellow belly encourages anglers to throw in a line at the Warrego River.

Outside the Paroo Shire Hall in Cunnamulla, an Australian bushman sits on his swag, savouring a mug of billy tea. Titled “The Cunnamulla Fella” the statue depicts the iconic Australian character described in the song of the same name, written by Stan Coster and recorded by Slim Dusty.

Just across the road are more well-known Australians.

The beautiful painted silos at Thallon are easily seen from the highway but it’s worth driving right into town for a closer view.

There’s no need to get up close to see this Northern Hairy Nosed Wombat. Located in the park in the centre of Thallon, the oversized sculpture brings attention to the wombat’s critically endangered status. Once found right across eastern Australia, this species of wombat now survives in just two areas of Queensland; in a National Park near Clermont and a conservation park near Thallon. At the Richard Underwood Nature Refuge, more than 200 wombats live in a securely fenced colony, protected from predators like wild dogs.

Flora and fauna, history and heritage, people and places – street art tells the stories of the towns of the outback.