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Calm Waters

Kind Squares Photo Challenge #19 ~ Queensland: One of a Kind

Destination: Tallebudgera Creek, Gold Coast

The protected waters of Tallebudgera Creek have long been a favourite of Gold Coast holiday makers. Originating in the hinterland at Springbrook, the creek flows down the mountain range and through the Tallebudgera Valley for 25 kilometres before joining the Coral Sea between Burleigh Headland and Palm Beach. 

Tallebudgera is one of those places families return to year after year and many south eastern Queenslanders have fond memories of their first school camp beside the creek.

The sandy beach is perfect for picnics and the calm water is a haven for swimmers. It’s no surprise that the creek is popular with fishermen too – the name Tallebudgera means “good fishing” in the local indigenous language. 

This month I’m joining in every day with Becky’s October Kind Square Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: most photos must be square and fit the theme word “kind”. Look for #kindasquare

Catching a Wave

Kind Squares Photo Challenge #18 ~ Queensland: One of a Kind

Destination: Burleigh Heads

Surfers take every opportunity to enjoy the sea and the sunshine at Burleigh Heads on the Gold Coast.

This month I’m joining in every day with Becky’s October Kind Square Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: most photos must be square and fit the theme word “kind”. Look for #kindasquare.

Do You Know?

Kind Squares Photo Challenge #11 ~ Queensland: One of a Kind

Destination: Bruce Highway

Distances are vast in Australia and fatigue brought on by long hours of driving is a common cause of car accidents. In some parts of the country Transport Departments have come up with a novel way to keep drivers alert. It’s called Fatigue Zone Trivia. Let’s play!

We’re on the Bruce Highway, driving north from Gympie to Tiaro.

Here are the answers. How did you go?

Don’t give up! There are more in the other direction.

Perhaps you’ve got them all correct this time.

It’s just a bit of fun but it might help to keep your mind on the job and it certainly encourages lively conversation.

*The Bruce Highway is 1,679 kilometres long and links Brisbane in the south to Cairns in the far north of Queensland.

*These photos were taken through the car windscreen by the passenger while travelling at 100 km/h.

This month I’m joining in every day with Becky’s October Kind Square Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: most photos must be square and fit the theme word “kind”. Look for #kindasquare.

Brooklyn House

Kind Squares Photo Challenge #10 ~ Queensland: One of a Kind

Destination: Brooklyn House, Howard

Dame Annabelle Rankin earned her place in Queensland’s history with many notable achievements. She was the first Queensland woman elected to the Senate, the first female to head a federal government ministry and, in her role as High Commissioner to New Zealand, the first Australian woman to lead a foreign mission.

Annabelle also supported many community groups and charities. Her highest honour came in 1957 when she was appointed a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1957 for her political and public service.

Brooklyn House, in the small Wide Bay town of Howard, was the childhood home of Annabelle Rankin. The grand Queenslander-style home was built in 1890 for the Rankin family and remained in their ownership until 1969. It was left derelict for many years before being restored by new owners to its former glory.

Set in lush sub-tropical gardens, the house is surrounded by a wide shady veranda which provides protection from the harsh Queensland sun.

It’s the perfect spot to enjoy a delicious Devonshire Tea.

This month I’m joining in every day with Becky’s October Kind Square Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: most photos must be square and fit the theme word “kind”. Look for #kindasquare

Sharing the Love

Kind Squares Photo Challenge #2 ~ Queensland: One of a Kind

Destination: Toowoomba

Visitors to Toowoomba’s annual Carnival of Flowers are spoiled for choice when it comes to gardens. Queen’s Park, Laurel Bank Park and Picnic Point have magnificent displays of spring annuals. Private gardens are also open to the public – some are entries in the garden competition and others are simply on display for all to enjoy.

The garden at Lorea House welcomed visitors for the first time this year. Created by Leisa and Serge Rossignol, it’s the result of their combined vision and hard work.

Leisa and Serge only began designing and constructing this garden in 2019, starting with a pretty pink summerhouse. Using a combination of new and repurposed materials, Serge created a retreat for Leisa that’s filled with memories. The windows came from a convent at a local church and the doors were found on a farm at Cambooya. Most precious of all is the tiny kitchen, which was originally in Leisa’s grandparents’ home on the family property at Brookstead.

Leisa says her love of gardening comes from her grandparents on both sides of her family, who all shared a passion for plants. It’s not surprising to learn that, although this garden is new, it’s not Leisa’s first. She’s been creating gardens since she was 20 years old and the beautiful space she enjoys now is her fifth.

With a compact block of just 630 m² this one was much smaller than previous gardens, and Leisa has filled it to overflowing with a beautiful mix of perennials, annuals, fruit trees and vegetables. During Carnival week, she spent her days talking about her plantings with the 2,800 people who came to Lorea House.

For Leisa, the joy of gardening is as much about sharing as creating.

See more of Leisa and Lorea House on Instagram at eleanorandruby

This month I’m joining in every day with Becky’s October Kind Square Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme word “kind”. Look for #kindasquare

End of Day

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #23

Destination: Bulcock Beach, Caloundra, Sunshine Coast, Queensland

Life at the beach doesn’t stop when the sun goes down. In the middle of summer the evening air is balmy and the water is the perfect temperature.

As the eastern sky takes on a rosy sunset glow, friends and families gather for beach-side picnics.

In the west the sun sinks towards the horizon, laying down a gilt trail across the calm waters of Pumicestone Passage.

This is my favourite time of day at the beach.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

No Mystery Here

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #20

Destination: Glen Innes, New South Wales

Standing stones, with their mysterious origins and unknown purpose, have attracted people for centuries. Most were placed in position thousands of years ago by communities long since disappeared.

The Australian Standing Stones in Glen Innes are neither mysterious nor ancient and their purpose is well documented. This monument acknowledges Celtic peoples around the world and is dedicated to migrants of Celtic origins who have made Australia their home.

The stone circle, inspired by the Ring of Brodgar in the Orkney Islands, is located in Centennial Park and is freely accessible to all. Completed in 1992, this stone circle has one thing in common with more ancient ones. The placement of the stones is significant, although this time the thoughts of the circle builders have been recorded for posterity.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

Repurposed

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #19

Destination: Deepwater, New South Wales

Away from the coastal fringe Australia’s vast inland was once dominated by the railways, as townships big and small relied upon trains to carry mail, produce and people across huge distances. Railway stations all along the train network connected the nation’s capital cities to regional and rural areas. With the growth of road transport in the second half of the 20th century, many inland railway lines ceased to be profitable and the stations along the tracks fell into disuse.

Deepwater Railway Station on the Main Northern Line opened in 1886, servicing the Northern Tablelands town of Deepwater and the surrounding rural district.

After earlier being one of the busiest in northern New South Wales, the railway station closed in 1972 when the railway line shut down.

Some railway track still exists alongside the platform, and the water tank and pipes used to fill the steam engines with water have been left standing.

While no longer used for its original purpose, the building has been conserved and now houses the local radio station. It’s still keeping communities connected.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

A Walk to Remember

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #11

Destination: Newcastle, New South Wales

It’s hard to imagine that the ANZAC landing at Gallipoli in Turkey and the multi-national mining company BHP would have anything in common, but the connection between the two goes all the way back to 1915.

The ANZAC forces, comprising troops from the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, landed on the shore at Gallipoli on 25 April 1915, in what was to be an eight month campaign with more than 8000 Australian casualties. In the same year BHP, which was founded as a mining company in the outback town of Broken Hill in 1885, opened their first steel works in Newcastle.

It was this connection between two Australian legends which led to the construction of the Newcastle Memorial Walk. Commemorating the 100th anniversary of the Gallipoli landing, the 450 metre memorial walk passes over Strzelecki Headland, linking Bar Beach and King Edward Park. 64 tonnes of steel, manufactured and paid for by BHP, were used in the construction of the walkway.

Half way along the path, a bridge passes over the cliffs near the top of the headland. It is here the ANZACs are remembered. Striking silhouettes of servicemen and women line each side of the bridge.

Cut from steel, they are engraved with the names of 4000 regional families whose loved ones served during World War One. Steel plaques on the bridge tell the stories of their service.

The Memorial Walk is a permanent reminder of the sacrifices made in 1915.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time. Also joining Jo’s Monday Walks.

Solitude

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #10

Destination: Port Stephens Region, New South Wales

Shoal Bay

Salamander Bay

Salamander Bay

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.