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Risen From the Ashes

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #16

Destination: Mount Stromlo Observatory, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory

On 18th January 2003 a firestorm raged through Canberra’s outer suburbs, destroying 470 homes and more than 70% of the ACT’s parks and farmland. One of the greatest losses occurred on Mount Stromlo where the Observatory, home of the Australian National University’s Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, was located. Five historic telescopes were destroyed along with several buildings including the research facilities. Only the visitors’ centre and cafe were left untouched.

Today little remains of the damage caused by the fire’s fury. The original dome still stands although it is no longer used.

The lost buildings have been replaced and the astronomers and scientists continue their valuable work, which is explained in displays at the visitors’ centre. Looking out over the city and its surrounds from the deck at the cafe, it’s hard to imagine the devastation caused by the fires on that January day.

 

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

Celebrating Tulips

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #15

Destination: Canberra, Australian Capital Territory

Where we live the climate is warm and temperate and, although our city is renowned for its beautiful gardens, tulips aren’t easy to grow here. In Canberra, one thousand kilometres further south, winters are colder and more rain falls, allowing tulips to flourish.

For 30 days from mid-September tulips take centre stage at Floriade, the largest annual garden festival in the southern hemisphere. Commonwealth Park resembles an ocean of colour, with displays of more than one million springtime flowers complemented by sculptures and art works.

It’s worth the journey to see tulips in all their glory.

 

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

Reflections

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #14

Destination: Canberra, Australian Capital Territory

Reflections on Lake Burley Griffin

 

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

Looking Down, Not Up

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #13

Destination: Rocky Hill, Goulburn, New South Wales

High atop a hill overlooking the regional city of Goulburn stands an imposing stone tower. Built in the 1920s and paid for by public subscription, the tower is a war memorial honouring local men and women who served in World War One.

Inside the tower, the ground floor contains an honour roll and a flame of remembrance, while from the upstairs windows there are beautiful views of the city and the surrounding countryside.

I found it difficult to look up at the tower as we walked along the path.

After seeing these signs, I was too busy looking out for danger.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

A Sheep’s Eye View

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #12

Destination: The Big Merino, Goulburn, New South Wales

The Big Merino in Goulburn is one of Australia’s collection of “big things”. The giant concrete ram honours the prosperous wool industry upon which the Goulburn region was founded.

The ram is not just for viewing on the outside. Inside his cavernous body, there’s an interesting display about wool farming and, upstairs in his head, a unique lookout.

From the ram’s eye, there’s a great view along Hume Street towards the Hume Highway, the 880 kilometre interstate arterial connecting Sydney and Melbourne.

It’s a sheep’s eye view of the world!

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

A Walk to Remember

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #11

Destination: Newcastle, New South Wales

It’s hard to imagine that the ANZAC landing at Gallipoli in Turkey and the multi-national mining company BHP would have anything in common, but the connection between the two goes all the way back to 1915.

The ANZAC forces, comprising troops from the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, landed on the shore at Gallipoli on 25 April 1915, in what was to be an eight month campaign with more than 8000 Australian casualties. In the same year BHP, which was founded as a mining company in the outback town of Broken Hill in 1885, opened their first steel works in Newcastle.

It was this connection between two Australian legends which led to the construction of the Newcastle Memorial Walk. Commemorating the 100th anniversary of the Gallipoli landing, the 450 metre memorial walk passes over Strzelecki Headland, linking Bar Beach and King Edward Park. 64 tonnes of steel, manufactured and paid for by BHP, were used in the construction of the walkway.

Half way along the path, a bridge passes over the cliffs near the top of the headland. It is here the ANZACs are remembered. Striking silhouettes of servicemen and women line each side of the bridge.

Cut from steel, they are engraved with the names of 4000 regional families whose loved ones served during World War One. Steel plaques on the bridge tell the stories of their service.

The Memorial Walk is a permanent reminder of the sacrifices made in 1915.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time. Also joining Jo’s Monday Walks.

Solitude

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #10

Destination: Port Stephens Region, New South Wales

Shoal Bay

Salamander Bay

Salamander Bay

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

Up, Down, Up

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #9

Destination: Tomaree Head, Shoal Bay, New South Wales

The sign said it was only a two kilometre walk, but it looked a long way up to the summit of Tomaree Head.

At first the track was easy going,

but soon the gentle incline was replaced by steps up to a cantilevered walkway leading through the trees and around the edge of the hill.

At the top our efforts were rewarded with expansive coastal views to the north and south.

Heading back downhill, we left the summit walk and turned onto another path. It led us up again to the Fort Tomaree gun emplacements, part of Australia’s coastal defences during the Second World War.

The guns were removed a long time ago, but the structures which housed them have been left behind.

It was easy to see why Tomaree Head was chosen as a strategic site. The views were spectacular.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time. Also joining Jo’s Monday Walks.

The Best Way to Ride

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #7

Destination: Stockton Sand Dunes, Port Stephens, New South Wales

When you first arrive at Stockton Sand Dunes, you could be forgiven for thinking you’d suddenly arrived in Egypt. The coastal vegetation is replaced by vast hills of pure white sand and a camel caravan passes a line of small pyramids bordering the dunes.

Covering 32 kilometres and reaching a height of more than 30 metres, the Stockton Sand Dunes are the largest in the southern hemisphere. The pyramids are relics of World War Two, part of a line of tank traps installed to protect Australia’s eastern coast from potential invaders. And the camels are one of the area’s most popular tourist attractions.

If camels don’t appeal there are other ways to enjoy the sand dunes. Four wheel drive vehicles and quad bikes are permitted on the dunes. Or just take a big piece of cardboard and make your own toboggan.

Cheap, easy and the most fun of all!

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

Nature on Display

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #6

Destination: Gan Gan Hill, New South Wales

From Gan Gan Lookout the views are spectacular. At an elevation of 160 metres, the vista extends past Soldiers Point, over to Tomaree Head and northwards across the water to Hawks Nest and Tea Gardens. The Karuah River estuary, larger in size but much shallower than Sydney Harbour, meets the Pacific Ocean between Tomaree Head and Yacaaba Head.

In spring the scenery is even better up at Gan Gan Lookout. Gymea lilies, native to the coastal regions around Sydney, grow in abundance on the slopes of Gan Gan Hill and as winter ends they begin to bloom. Spikes reaching up to 6 metres long are topped by clusters of delicate red flowers.

The lilies almost surpass the views!

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.