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Unrivalled Views

Exploring England #25

At the top of the hill where the busy A591 enters the Lake District village of Windermere, a small sign publicises a walking track – a footpath leading to views of the surrounding area. Set back from the road against an old stone wall, it’s easily missed. We were lucky to see it, and even luckier that we returned after our cruise on the lake to investigate.

A “20 minute walk with unrivalled views” seemed like the ideal end to a perfect day. The wide footpath, doubling as the road to local homes, was level and even – we looked forward to a gentle country stroll.

We hadn’t gone far when the road was replaced by a broad leaf strewn path leading into the woods. A weathered sign post pointed the way past old dry stone walls overgrown with moss.

After the bustle of the crowds at the lake, the shady woods were quiet. Even the birds seemed to enjoy the peace.

After passing through a rusted turnstile, the incline was more noticeable, and a simple wooden bench offered a few minutes’ respite. Our gentle stroll was turning into a hill climb.

The path became a stony track muddied by yesterday’s rain, but we were spurred on by tantalising glimpses of the views beyond the farm gates.

The further the path went up the hill the more it deteriorated. Wooden steps dug into the hillside gave way to a rough track up the last steep stretch.

We clambered up the last few metres, leaving the woods for the open hill top of Orrest Head.

A few more upwards steps revealed what we’d come to see – 360° views of Lake Windermere surrounded by the Lake District Fells and the Pennines. In the late afternoon sunshine, the lake was dark and silvery. Little boats left sparkling trails in their wake and the waters of Morecambe Bay glistened far away on the horizon. In the opposite direction, farmhouses were dwarfed by the rolling hills of the Fells.

After meeting no one on the path, we were surprised to see others on the hill. Like us, they were silent – awed by the spectacular view, and perhaps also like us, glad they hadn’t missed the sign on the A591.

Weekly Photo Challenge ~ Earth

Join Restless Jo for more Monday Walks

Up To The Top

Exploring England #21

Walking – it’s what people do when they visit the Peak District National Park. Some enjoy a gentle stroll through a pretty village while others take on the challenge of hiking the 431 km Pennine Way National Trail.

Somewhere in between the two extremes are 3,005 km of walking tracks with right of way through farming land.

Let’s go – through the gate

up the hill

over the stile

to a vantage point at the top of the ridge.

Walkers are rewarded with expansive views of the village of Castleton and the limestone hills bordering the Hope Valley.

Imagine the views when they go even higher!

Visit Restless Jo for more Monday Walks

Weekly Photo Challenge ~ Atop

On The Outside

Exploring England #18

As we explored the streets of Manchester, I spent much of my time admiring the elaborate façades of the buildings. During the Industrial Revolution, the city was the centre of the nation’s textile industry and many of the buildings reflect the enormous wealth created by many but enjoyed by just a few. Luckily, these beautiful buildings can now be appreciated by everyone.

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Weekly Photo Challenge ~ The Road Taken

Someone’s Coming

Exploring England #16

More than 10 million people visit the Peak District National Park every year. Many of them were at the picturesque village of Castleton with us. Try as I might, it was impossible to take people-free photos. Even when I thought I’d got one, someone was always there!

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Weekly Photo Challenge ~ Shadow

Someone I Know

Exploring England #11

As I’ve mentioned before, my husband is passionate about beer. He brews his own at home and enjoys sampling local beers when we travel. It’s easy to imagine how excited he was when he discovered there are 1,424 breweries in England. In a country of 130,395 km² that’s one brewery for every 91 km². He was a happy traveller!

He enjoyed visiting quaint local pubs, tasting new beers and posting his photos and reviews on Facebook.

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Often, he chose a beer purely for its name.

We wondered if the brewers had a particular person in mind when they came up with these humorous labels.

Weekly Photo Challenge ~ Names

In case you’re wondering, here are my husband’s thoughts on these three beers.

Coniston Brewing Co. Old Man Ale – 4.8% Ruby red ale with a mild hop taste. Smooth drinking. Just the drink for the old men out there prior to their afternoon nap

York Brewery Guzzler – very nice, tasty and light. A refreshing easy-to-drink brew

Skinner’s Ginger Tosser – Just couldn’t go past the label. It reminds me of someone I know. You can taste the ginger mid-palate and honey on the back of the tongue. Ginger aftertaste. 3.8% lowest brew yet.

Blooming Truro

Exploring England #8

Garden Photography: Urban Spaces

In the warmth of a September evening, Truro is bright with natural colour. Beautiful hanging baskets greet visitors to Truro Cathedral.

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Window boxes overflowing with greenery and planters filled with late summer blooms decorate the streets.

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Begonias, all velvety yellows, oranges and reds, are complemented by delicate purple salvia.

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These vibrant flowers fill me with anticipation for my own Southern Hemisphere summer!

Enjoy more blooming urban spaces with Jude.

The Sum of Its Parts

Exploring England #3

Think of beaches and images of never-ending sand, wide blue skies and brilliant sunshine come to mind. But Chesil Beach, on the Jurassic Coast in Dorset is anything but sandy.

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The beach, formed at the end of the last ice age, is 28 km long, up to 12 metres high and completely composed of pebbles. The size of the pebbles varies from one end of the beach to the other. At West Bay in the north the pebbles are tiny while south at Portland they are much larger. It’s said that fishermen landing on the coast at night can pinpoint their location according to the size of the stones on the beach.

Fleet Lagoon runs parallel to the ocean behind Chesil Beach between Portland and Abbotsbury. The lagoon is tidal and at low tide there’s just a puddle of brackish water left. A boardwalk across the tidal flats is decorated with wooden carvings of local wildlife.

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After the bridge crossing, the pebbles begin. It’s an arduous climb to the top of the mound and the slope on the other side, down to the water’s edge, is just as steep.

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The beach may be vast, but each of its parts is tiny.

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Weekly Photo Challenge ~ Tiny