Tag Archive | Darwin

Cityscape

An Australian Point of View #1 Capital Cities

Australia is the sixth largest country in the world with a land mass of 7,692,014 square kilometres. Despite its size, Australia is composed of just six states and two territories, all with their own capital city. Every capital has its own distinctive architecture; some buildings are more well-known than others, but each plays a part in the story of its city.

Brisbane, Queensland

The heritage-listed Albert Street Uniting Church, completed in 1889, is dwarfed by the surrounding city tower blocks. By the early 1900s it was the main Methodist Church in the city and is now the home of Wesley Mission Queensland. With its Victorian Gothic architecture and its inner city position, the church is a popular wedding venue.

Melbourne, Victoria

The Arts Centre Melbourne is Australia’s busiest Performing Arts complex. Construction began in 1973 and the buildings were completed in stages, the last being finished in 1984. The steel spire is 162 metres high and is surrounded at the base by a ruffle of steel mesh reminiscent of a ballerina’s tutu.

Adelaide, South Australia

The scoreboard at the Adelaide Oval has been keeping track of cricket matches since 3 November, 1911. The heritage-listed Edwardian scoreboard is the only one of its type in the Southern Hemisphere and is still manually operated.  A tour of Adelaide Oval includes a visit inside the four storey scoreboard.

Perth, Western Australia

The Bell Tower in Barracks Square houses the Swan Bells, a collection of 18 change ringing bells. Twelve of the bells come from St Martin-in-the-Fields Church in London and date from the 13th century. They were gifted to the city of Perth during Australia’s Bicentenary, while the Bell Tower was completed in time for Millennium celebrations.

Hobart, Tasmania

The Shot Tower at Taroona, just outside Hobart, was built in 1879 and was, for four years, Australia’s tallest building. Lead shot was produced in the tower for 35 years. Next door is the home of Joseph Moir, who constructed the tower and other landmark buildings in Hobart. The shot tower is still the tallest of its type in the Southern Hemisphere.

Darwin, Northern Territory

Government House, on the Esplanade in Darwin, is the oldest European building in the Northern Territory. Completed in 1871, the house is the official residence of the Administrator of the Northern Territory. The Victorian Gothic design is complemented by wide verandas, which help to cool the house in Darwin’s tropical climate.

Canberra, Australian Capital Territory

Parliament House is the meeting place of the Parliament of Australia. This is the second Parliament House and replaced Old Parliament House, which was in use from 1927 to 1988. This new building was opened in 1988 by Queen Elizabeth II during Australia’s Bicentenary celebrations. The Commonwealth Coat of Arms adorns the front façade, and an Australian flag the size of a half tennis court flies at the top of the 81 metre high flagpole.


Sydney, New South Wales

The Sydney Opera House, opened in 1973, overlooks Sydney Harbour at Bennelong Point. Every year, more than eight million people visit this UNESCO World Heritage Site and it hosts more than 1,500 events and performances. The Opera House becomes a focal point during Sydney’s Vivid Festival each June.


Participating in Becky’s #RoofSquares Challenge

A Look Around Darwin

Round Australia Road Trip #2

Darwin is the capital of the Northern Territory, in the part of Australia more fondly known as the Top End. It’s a laid back kind of place with a tropical climate and a relaxed lifestyle. We lived in Darwin for more than two years in the 1980s and it was still in rebuilding mode after being devastated by Cyclone Tracy in 1974. This was my first time back in the city and after 30 years I expected to see some changes.

In some ways, Darwin is very different. There are many new buildings, roadways and many more shops and businesses. In other ways it seemed as though very little had changed – the people still have the same easy going attitude to life and they are as friendly as ever.

The biggest change is the trees. In 1984, the landscape was dominated by new homes with new gardens. Now, there are trees – big trees – in every garden, on the footpaths and lining the highways. It’s green and lush, with tall palms, banana trees and spreading poincianas filling the skyline.

It’s definitely a change for the better.

Taking to the Road

Round Australia Road Trip #1

Welcome to the first instalment of the Round Australia Road Trip Journal.

A couple of weeks ago my husband, aka Mr ET, and our daughter set off on the first part of a great adventure. They travelled from Toowoomba to Roma, Longreach and Mount Isa, into the Northern Territory on the Barkly Highway, on to the Stuart Highway north to Mataranka, Katherine and Kakadu before arriving in Darwin. They covered 4046 kilometres in 11 days and saw many amazing sights along the way.

Two weeks later, I joined them in Darwin. I took the easy way, flying from Brisbane to Darwin! I travelled 2860 kilometres and the flight took four hours. I was lucky enough to have a window seat and this is what I saw on the way.

Our daughter left us in Darwin and now it’s just Mr ET and me, travelling back to Toowoomba, taking the long way round via Perth.

The journey so far…