Tag Archive | Katoomba

From the Top to the Bottom

Kevtoberfest #11 Blue Mountains Part Two

After wandering at a leisurely pace from Katoomba Falls to Echo Point and stopping again to admire the expansive views, our walk continues to Spooners Lookout. There’s a good reason we’ve chosen to walk in this direction. The next section, downwards from the Three Sisters to Dardanelles Pass at the base of the cliffs, includes 900 steps!

From Echo Point we’ve already seen where we’re going next – to Honeymoon Bridge. This narrow footbridge links the main part of the range to the first of the sisters. It crosses the gap high above the valley floor and leads to a wind-eroded sandstone overhang halfway up the rocky outcrop.

We cross the bridge over and back, and then begin the downward climb on the Giant Stairway. Some of the 900 steps are metal and easy to negotiate, while others are made of timber sleepers or simply cut into the sandstone.

There are switchbacks and curving turns, wider sections where gaps between the trees reveal more beautiful views, and several benches where we stop to rest awhile; we’re in no hurry.

Near the halfway point, we hear bellbirds. Their chiming song fills the canopy, although again the elusive birds remain hidden in the dense forest.

Finally, we reach the last few steps down to Dardanelles Pass. More benches set into the narrow pass at the base of the steps beckon and we take a break for lunch.

After walking down the Giant Stairway, the next section of level track is easy. We turn onto the Federal Pass track, which curves around the base of the Three Sisters and heads across the valley towards Scenic World. Tree ferns shade the path and, as we look back, we can clearly see where we’ve come from.

Ahead we hear moving water. After flowing over the cascades at the top of the range, the waters of Kedumba Creek drop over the cliff edge, falling more than 200 metres to the valley floor.

At last we reach the entrance to Scenic World.

After meeting only a few other walkers on the track, we can now hear many people up ahead. They’re seeing the Blue Mountains from yet another perspective, and we’re about to join them.

To be continued…

Join Jo for more Monday Walks

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More Than a Walk in the Park

Kevtoberfest #10 Blue Mountains Part One

There are many ways to enjoy the splendid scenery of the Blue Mountains. From lookouts like Echo Point, perched on the edge of the escarpment, views of the sheer sandstone cliffs and forest-filled valleys are magnificent.

More than 400 kilometres of walking tracks allow visitors to explore both on top of the mountains and down below.

For those less keen on hiking, there are options to soar above the valleys in Australia’s highest or largest cable cars, wander through the forest canopy on the longest elevated boardwalk in the country or ride on the steepest passenger train in the world. When it comes to seeing the Blue Mountains, it’s possible to take advantage of all these choices in a single day.

Our day long exploration begins at Katoomba Falls, where Kedumba Creek tumbles down waterworn cascades before wending its way to the cliff edge. Here the walking is easy, along a level graded path with wide steps leading to the beginning of Prince Henry Cliff Walk.

Not far from the start we come to the Scenic Skyway East Station. We’re right on time to see the cable car silently gliding over the valley, soaring like a golden bird 270 metres above the forest floor.

After the station, the track becomes narrower and hugs the edge of the cliff, skirting between massive sandstone formations and windswept eucalypts clinging precariously to the steep edges.

There’s not always a fence and we are careful to walk closer to the rock wall, slowing down when other hikers pass by.

There are many lookouts on the track and, although this is listed as a 45 minute walk, we stop so often it’s nearly two hours before Echo Point and the Three Sisters come into view.

Even though we’ve already been to Echo Point we halt once more, lingering to take in the beauty of this place before walking on.

To be continued…

Join Jo for more Monday Walks

By Day, Into Night

Kevtoberfest #9 Echo Point, Katoomba

The Blue Mountains Region, west of Sydney, is part of the Great Dividing Range and covers an area of 11,400 square kilometres. The rugged sandstone escarpments, sheer cliffs and deep valleys filled with dense eucalypt forest are World Heritage listed and visited by millions of people each year.

One of the best vantage points to view the splendour of the mountains is Echo Point, at Katoomba. Perched on the cliff edge are several lookouts, some jutting out over the valley floor.

With spectacular views of the Three Sisters, the lookouts are popular at any time of day, and especially at sunset when the colour of the stone and sky changes by the minute.

There’s a sense of excitement as the sun begins its descent but, when the last rays of light disappear behind the cliffs, most people watch in silence.

Even the sulphur crested cockatoos, settling into the gum trees for the night, cease their screeching as the daylight begins to fade. It’s an awe-inspiring sight for everyone!