Tag Archive | New South Wales

Hidden Beauty

Australian Landscapes #32

Destination: Lockhart, New South Wales

Unlike the silos at Thallon or the water tower in Cunnamulla, the painted water tower in Lockhart takes some effort to find. For a start, Lockhart isn’t on any major roads so you’ll need to make a detour. And, once you’ve arrived in this small Riverina town, you’ll still need to search because the water tower is almost hidden by the trees in the garden around it.

But it’s worth looking for!

Located on the main street, the water tower was painted in 2018 by two Blue Mountains artists using freehand techniques and spray cans. The mural they created pays tribute to one of Australia’s most important resources – water. It depicts a waterfall tumbling over a rocky cliff before flowing down to a creek on the forest floor, giving sustenance to the plants and animals native to this area.

If you’re on the road in the Riverina district, look out for the turn off to Lockhart. The extra kilometres will be forgotten when you do find the water tower!

Cloud Shapes

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #27

Destination: Granite Lookout, Washpool National Park, New South Wales

The information board at the Granite Picnic Area promised us sweeping views of the Gibraltar Ranges.

We walked for 400 metres on a track shaded by eucaplypt forest,

until we came to a natural granite platform on the edge of the range, 1065 metres above sea level.

The huge slab of granite was perfectly positioned to see over the hidden gully where Coombadjha Creek flowed to the tree covered mountains beyond.

After walking through the forest with its branches arching overhead, the open sky was a welcome change.

We got all we were promised and more.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time. Also joining Jo’s Monday Walks.

A Natural Balancing Act

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #26

Destination: Stonehenge Recreational Reserve, New South Wales

At Stonehenge Recreational Reserve it looks like a giant tossed his pebble collection like a little boy tosses marbles. Beside the New England Highway not far from Glen Innes, dozens of huge granite boulders lie scattered across 32 hectares of parkland. Some are only just exposed, with most of their massive bulk still buried underground. Others rest on their side or stack up against each other.

Some boulders balance haphazardly in precarious positions,

while others seem perilously close to toppling.

When the first English settlers arrived here in 1838, they named their property “Stonehenge”. It’s not hard to imagine why.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

A Walk In the Forest

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #25

Destination: Washpool National Park, New South Wales

The temperate rainforest at Washpool National Park is part of the World Heritage listed Gondwana Rainforests of Australia. The plants growing in the park now are the same species as those which grew here 550 million years ago, when Australia was part of the supercontinent Gondwana.

Come for a walk in the forest with me.

Ferns with ancient ancestry begin life on the forest floor, while larger tree ferns form umbrella-shaped shelter overhead.

Vines and aerial roots twist together, using tree trunks for support in their quest to reach the sky.

The clear water of Summit Creek flows around granite boulders strewn in its path, creating an ever-changing canvas of ripples and reflections.

The tallest trees compete for sunlight which filters down through the canopy, making shadowplay on the tracks below.

Before turning back, let’s rest a while. With its mossy coat, this bench might have been here since Gondwana.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time. Also joining Jo’s Monday Walks.

Winter Sunset

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #24

Destination: Patonga, New South Wales 

On a warm summer evening, everyone lingers at the beach long after the sun has set. It’s a different story in winter.

The temperature plummets when the sun goes down. Activity ceases and the beach is empty as people seek warmth indoors.

Only the hardiest of souls is still out.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

Mooove Over

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #21

Destination: Oxley Highway, Northern New South Wales

It’s not uncommon to see cattle grazing on the side of the road while being moved from one paddock to another. Usually there are warning signs of stock ahead and stockmen on horseback keep an eye out for stragglers.

But there’s always one in the herd who likes to bend the rules and take his time crossing the road. And of course, no vehicle is going to take him on.

These photos were taken through the windscreen with my phone. I wasn’t going to take this fellow on either!

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

No Mystery Here

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #20

Destination: Glen Innes, New South Wales

Standing stones, with their mysterious origins and unknown purpose, have attracted people for centuries. Most were placed in position thousands of years ago by communities long since disappeared.

The Australian Standing Stones in Glen Innes are neither mysterious nor ancient and their purpose is well documented. This monument acknowledges Celtic peoples around the world and is dedicated to migrants of Celtic origins who have made Australia their home.

The stone circle, inspired by the Ring of Brodgar in the Orkney Islands, is located in Centennial Park and is freely accessible to all. Completed in 1992, this stone circle has one thing in common with more ancient ones. The placement of the stones is significant, although this time the thoughts of the circle builders have been recorded for posterity.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

Repurposed

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #19

Destination: Deepwater, New South Wales

Away from the coastal fringe Australia’s vast inland was once dominated by the railways, as townships big and small relied upon trains to carry mail, produce and people across huge distances. Railway stations all along the train network connected the nation’s capital cities to regional and rural areas. With the growth of road transport in the second half of the 20th century, many inland railway lines ceased to be profitable and the stations along the tracks fell into disuse.

Deepwater Railway Station on the Main Northern Line opened in 1886, servicing the Northern Tablelands town of Deepwater and the surrounding rural district.

After earlier being one of the busiest in northern New South Wales, the railway station closed in 1972 when the railway line shut down.

Some railway track still exists alongside the platform, and the water tank and pipes used to fill the steam engines with water have been left standing.

While no longer used for its original purpose, the building has been conserved and now houses the local radio station. It’s still keeping communities connected.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

Looking Down, Not Up

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #13

Destination: Rocky Hill, Goulburn, New South Wales

High atop a hill overlooking the regional city of Goulburn stands an imposing stone tower. Built in the 1920s and paid for by public subscription, the tower is a war memorial honouring local men and women who served in World War One.

Inside the tower, the ground floor contains an honour roll and a flame of remembrance, while from the upstairs windows there are beautiful views of the city and the surrounding countryside.

I found it difficult to look up at the tower as we walked along the path.

After seeing these signs, I was too busy looking out for danger.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

A Sheep’s Eye View

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #12

Destination: The Big Merino, Goulburn, New South Wales

The Big Merino in Goulburn is one of Australia’s collection of “big things”. The giant concrete ram honours the prosperous wool industry upon which the Goulburn region was founded.

The ram is not just for viewing on the outside. Inside his cavernous body, there’s an interesting display about wool farming and, upstairs in his head, a unique lookout.

From the ram’s eye, there’s a great view along Hume Street towards the Hume Highway, the 880 kilometre interstate arterial connecting Sydney and Melbourne.

It’s a sheep’s eye view of the world!

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.