Tag Archive | New South Wales

A Loo With a View – The Kevtoberfest Edition

Kevtoberfest #26

Australian loos have lovely views

from the mountains to the sea,

When you need to answer nature’s call

they’re where you want to be!

~

This bush loo looks a little rough

but believe me when I say,

it’s better than no loo at all

in a bushland hideaway.

The road to Perry’s Lookdown

Perry’s Lookdown, Blue Mountains

~

These stylish loos are made of stone

which is very apt.

They overlook some famous rocks.

At sunset we were rapt!

The Three Sisters, Katoomba, Blue Mountains

~

At Jenolan we found two beaut loos

in excellent locations.

Outside there were garden views

and a hotel for vacations.

Jenolan Caves House, Jenolan

~

The Grand Arch housed a second loo

amongst the cave formations.

Please use this loo

before you start your caving explorations.

The Grand Arch, Jenolan

~

The town of Bermagui

has a loo up on the hill.

With views in all directions,

it really fits the bill!

Bermagui River

Horseshoe Bay, Bermagui

~

This loo may look a little plain

– it’s very practical.

But sunset over the water

is simply magical.

Wagonga Inlet, Narooma

~

This tidy loo is on the lakes –

the water views are fine.

The locals like to gather

and enjoy the bright sunshine.

Lakes Entrance


~

So when you’re on a road trip

and the distances are long,

If you find loos with views like these

You really can’t go wrong!

 

More loos with beautiful views!

The original Loo With a View

Loos with views in Western Australia

The highest loo view in Australia

Loos with views around Australia

Loos with views – The Cruise Edition

Loos with views – The Hawaiian Edition

Loos with views – The English Edition

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Out of the Ordinary

Kevtoberfest #25 Gundagai and Holbrook

No matter how large or small, country towns and cities in Australia all have memorials commemorating past events. Many are war memorials with the names of long ago battles and those who served. Some recall explorers who passed by or local residents who achieved greatness. Others are either famous or a complete surprise, with a fascinating story to match.

Eight kilometres out of Gundagai is a memorial to the pioneers who journeyed west and settled in what would become the Riverina region. In the early days, supplies were transported from the coast to the inland by bullock drays. The routes were difficult and unpredictable and the bullock drivers, known as bullockies, took many risks to deliver their precious cargo on time. In the 1850s, an unknown poet penned the tale of “Bullocky Bill“, recording the hardships of life on the road for the bullockies and their faithful dogs.

The Dog on the Tuckerbox depicts the bullocky’s dog immortalised in the poem, loyally guarding his master’s food store.  The statue was unveiled in 1932 and has become an iconic Australian symbol.


While the faithful dog is well-known, further south at Holbrook is another memorial much more unusual and not so famous – the upper section of an Oberon-class submarine. Why does a town so far from the sea have a connection with a submarine?

Until 1915 the town was known as Germanton but, with patriotism at a high during World War One, the decision was made to change its name. “Holbrook” was chosen to honour Lieutenant Norman Holbrook, a submariner with the Royal Navy. He had become an international hero after deeds of bravery in the Dardanelles earned him a Victoria Cross. In the years after the war, Norman and his wife Gundula visited the town three times. Following Norman’s death in 1976, she made a bequest to the town for a memorial to submariners in his name.

The submarine HMAS Otway, decommissioned after 26 years service with the Royal Australian Navy, was the perfect choice for a memorial. The funds gifted by Gundula were used to purchase the submarine’s upper casing, fin and stern and they were transported by semi-trailer to Holbrook. The submariners’ memorial and museum were established and opened in a ceremony in 1997, attended by Gundula Holbrook.


Today, Holbrook is known as “the Submarine Town”, even though it is more than 300 kilometres from the sea and no one drives past Gundagai without visiting the famous dog. Some memorials are far more interesting than others!

Taking a Break

Kevtoberfest #18 Narooma to Mallacoota

Long distance driving can be tiring and it’s important to take regular breaks every couple of hours. When the route we’re taking passes through pretty country villages and coastal towns, we don’t need an excuse to stop and stretch our legs.

After leaving Narooma and continuing on our southward journey, our first stop was at the little village of Central Tilba. Located at the base of Mount Dromedary, Central Tilba and its neighbour Tilba Tilba are heritage listed, with beautifully preserved period cottages and shops.

It was early morning and the galleries and cafés were still closed. The only inhabitants we saw were some noisy rainbow lorikeets, breakfasting on the flowers of melaleuca trees.

Luckily, the ABC Cheese Factory was open and we joined some other keen customers, sampling and purchasing a few delicious cheeses. 

It wasn’t far to our next stop – we travelled just 20 kilometres to the coastal town of Bermagui. Situated on the Bermagui River where its wide natural harbour enters the ocean, the town is best known for its deep sea fishing industry.

Leaving the car and caravan at Dickinson Park, we walked past the marina and the broad sandy beach at Horseshoe Bay to Bermagui Point.

From the lookout on the headland we could see the coast from north to south, and inland to the mountains of the Great Dividing Range.

All this exploration gave us an appetite so, another 72 kilometres south, we stopped beside Merimbula Lake for a picnic lunch.

After so many scenic stops, our last break for the day had no connection to nature or history and was an unexpected surprise. Just south of Pambula on the Princes Highway, I spotted a sign – for a brewery! Of course, we turned off the highway and followed the directions to the Longstocking Nano Brewery, located alongside a café, gallery and garden centre.

The beers brewed onsite have 1920s themed names and are only available on tap, so Glen enjoyed a tasting paddle while I sampled the handcrafted ginger beer.

That was enough to sustain us for the rest of the afternoon and we continued to our final destination, just over the Victorian border at the seaside town of Mallacoota.

Road Trip Tally: Breweries 7/Craft shops 3

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Down to the Sea

Kevtoberfest #17 Wagonga Inlet

After days spent wandering in the bush, exploring caves and enjoying flower-filled gardens, we left the mountains and headed east to the coast of southern New South Wales. We drove more than 400 kilometres, first on winding mountain roads before turning onto the expansive Hume Highway. On the Princes Highway, we followed the curve of the coastline to the fishing town of Narooma.

It was late afternoon by the time we pulled into our site in a waterside campground at Wagonga Inlet. With the sun about to disappear behind the hills and the clouds reflected in the darkening water, we set off on a walk along the shore.

The track passed by fishing boats moored for the night and homes overlooking the channel where the water of the inlet enters the Pacific Ocean.

A waterbird foraged on the shore and a stingray passed by, gliding silently through the shallows.

A playful seal swam in wide circles, sometimes coming close before moving into deeper water.

A pelican, seeming to ignore us but ever watchful for tasty morsels, cruised along with the current.

The glory of the sky, changing minute by minute as the sun set, was reflected in the calm waters of the inlet. For a long time we stood watching, until the oncoming darkness made us retrace our steps. After a long day’s drive we were ready for a restful night in this tranquil place.

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Abundance

Kevtoberfest #16 Blue Mountains

In late September the Blue Mountains were in full bloom, with flowering natives and exotic blossoms competing for our attention at every stop.

At Jenolan Caves, spring flowers and magnolias filled every available space.

On the Federal Pass track to Scenic World, tiny native blossoms glowed in jewel-like colours.

In Leura, cherry trees laden with delicate blossoms attracted photographers and bees alike.

Waratahs grew wild beside the road to Anvil Rock

and at the Botanic Gardens alongside rhododendrons, proteas and camellias.

Clusters of golden flowers glowed beside blackened seed pods on banksias at Gordon Falls Reserve.

Springtime in the Blue Mountains is blooming beautiful!

Views, Brews and Two Yarn Shops

Kevtoberfest #15 The Blue Mountains

The first place we went to after arriving at Katoomba was the Visitor Information Centre at Echo Point. We collected tourist magazines, maps and brochures, which we used to plan our next few days. Every day we followed our itinerary, but some of our discoveries along the way weren’t on the maps or in the brochures!

The Blue Mountains National Park covers an area of 2,680 square kilometres and dozens of vantage points and lookouts are marked on the maps. Although the majesty and expanse of the mountains and valleys is revealed from every one, each view is a little different.

From Govett’s Leap Lookout, the densely forested Grose Valley disappeared into the early morning mist. The lookout was named for the surveyor William Govett, who we hoped didn’t actually leap from the cliff into the valley below.

Looking across from Gordon Falls to Sublime Point, we could see homes surrounded by bushland on top of the ridge. Opposite them on the other side of the valley were the Three Sisters, a different perspective from that seen at Echo Point.

The best lookout we visited wasn’t on any of our maps; it was by chance we followed a weathered sign off the main road. Anvil Rock is a weathered sandstone outcrop located at the end of a walking track along a narrow ridge.

From the top of the rock we had 360° views of the mountains, escarpments and gorges.

Near the lookout is a large wind-eroded cave, easily reached along another sandy track. It was fascinating to see up close the formations which make up much of the natural beauty of the national park.

Not all our discoveries were of the natural kind. Driving through Blackheath on our way to the Campbell Rhododendron Garden, I was quick to spot two craft shops next door to each other, and even quicker to suggest we stop to investigate. I went first to The House of Wool and then to Blackheath Haberdashery and Fabrics. With so much beautiful yarn it wasn’t easy to select just a few, and Glen was happy to help.

Another day in Katoomba, I noticed a sign pointing the way to the Katoomba Brewing Company. Located in a converted power station behind the iconic Carrington Hotel, the brewery makes several beers which are served on tap next door at the Old City Bank Bar and Brasserie. Of course Glen ordered a glass of Oktoberfest Lager, in preparation for Kevtoberfest.

It’s great to make plans and get the best out of each day, but we’re always prepared to abandon the plan when something unexpected comes up.

Road Trip Tally: Breweries 6/Craft shops 3

Hidden Beneath

Kevtoberfest #13 Jenolan Caves

Surrounded by forest-covered mountains and accessible by a single narrow winding road, the tiny village of Jenolan is one of the most visited places in New South Wales. The heritage listed hotel is picturesque, the pretty gardens are filled with cool climate plants and the river walk is scenic, but they’re not the main attractions.

The road to the village passes through the Grand Arch, a massive open cave at the base of the mountain. With a length of 127 metres, the cave gives an indication of what is to come. It has entrances to more caves and features a stone bathroom reminiscent of Fred Flintstone’s style.

Deep inside the mountains is a glistening wonderland: stalactites and stalagmites, shawls and crystals, massive caves, underground rivers and ancient fossils. The Jenolan Caves are among the oldest in the world, formed more than 340 million years ago from limestone dated to 430 million years. Eight show caves, each with its own unique natural display, are open to visitors on guided tours while more can be seen on self-guided walks.

The most difficult choice will be which of the caves to see. Tours allow for groups of different sizes and have varying levels of difficulty and accessibility so everyone is catered for. The circuit walk through Chifley Cave, with its high chambers and sparkling grottos, has 421 steps over 690 metres. This cave was the first in the world to be lit with electric lights, originally multi-coloured displays designed to decorate the formations. Now, more subdued lighting enhances the natural colours in the limestone, showing up the ripples and waves.

The Orient Cave contains both the smallest crystals and largest formations in the cave system. Covering a distance of 470 metres and 358 steps, the walk through the chambers is illuminated using the latest lighting technology, giving better views of the stalactites and stalagmites while protecting them from unnecessary heat.

There are several walks in the caves area, and one of the easiest is the River Walk. Starting from the Grand Arch, the track passes around the shore of Blue Lake. Formed in a natural swamp when a dam wall was constructed in 1908, the lake is coloured by dissolved limestone particles in the water. The still water reflects mirror-like images of the surrounding she-oaks and ribbon gums.

The dam wall is part of a hydro-electric plant which still produces power for Jenolan. Remnants of the original system are visible further along the track on the Jenolan River, where it cascades over boulders and drops in rushing waterfalls on its way out of the valley.

Crimson rosellas dart through the trees and Eastern water dragons can sometimes be seen basking on the rocks by the river.

On the return journey, Carlotta Arch is silhouetted high on the ridge above the road. The jagged limestone stalactites hanging from the ceiling give one last reminder of the beauty hidden beneath the surface at Jenolan.

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