Tag Archive | New South Wales

#14 River Secrets

I’m joining Becky in her February Square Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules of the challenge are simple: most photos must be square and fit the theme word Odd, referencing one of these definitions: different to what is usual or expected, or strange; a number of items, with one left over as a remainder when divided by two; happening or occurring infrequently and irregularly, or occasionally; separated from a usual pair or set and therefore out of place or mismatched. Look for #SquareOdds.

While we didn’t travel as much as usual in 2021, we were fortunate to enjoy several holidays in our home state of Queensland and one short trip over the border in New South Wales. Join me this month in a retrospective look at the very odd year of 2021. 

Lees Camping Reserve QLD/NSW Border, February 2021

Another campsite, another river; this time we free-camped off the grid at a reserve on the bank of the Dumaresq River, close to the state border.

While the river scenery was beautiful, it was the geological formations beside the water which intrigued us. Two distinctly different rock types lay side by side.

One was a conglomerate – hard, red and pockmarked with circular indentations. Hundreds of tiny pebbles were embedded in each white circle.

The other was softer. Sandstone-like, this layer was deeply eroded. Puddles were evidence of higher river levels at some earlier time.

If only the river was able to tell us the story of this perplexing landscape.

#13 Smoke Does Not Get In Your Eyes

I’m joining Becky in her February Square Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules of the challenge are simple: most photos must be square and fit the theme word Odd, referencing one of these definitions: different to what is usual or expected, or strange; a number of items, with one left over as a remainder when divided by two; happening or occurring infrequently and irregularly, or occasionally; separated from a usual pair or set and therefore out of place or mismatched. Look for #SquareOdds.

While we didn’t travel as much as usual in 2021, we were fortunate to enjoy several holidays in our home state of Queensland and one short trip over the border in New South Wales. Join me this month in a retrospective look at the very odd year of 2021. 

Yetman NSW, February 2021

What is this strange creature at our campsite?

While it looks like some alien robot has arrived from outer space, it’s actually a camping stove called a pig oven. Light a fire inside and soon you have warmth and heat to cook a meal or boil the kettle.

And best of all, the smoke goes up the tall chimney and blows away instead of into your eyes.

#12 Drifter

I’m joining Becky in her February Square Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules of the challenge are simple: most photos must be square and fit the theme word Odd, referencing one of these definitions: different to what is usual or expected, or strange; a number of items, with one left over as a remainder when divided by two; happening or occurring infrequently and irregularly, or occasionally; separated from a usual pair or set and therefore out of place or mismatched. Look for #OddSquare.

While we didn’t travel as much as usual in 2021, we were fortunate to enjoy several holidays in our home state of Queensland and one short trip over the border in New South Wales. Join me this month in a retrospective look at the very odd year of 2021. 

Yetman NSW, February 2021

The morning after the storm, the only sign of nature’s light and sound show was a dramatic rise in the river. The branches of the willow trees now dipped down into the water, and the spot on the bank where the men were standing as they fished the previous day had disappeared.

As we surveyed the scene, a lone boat appeared around the bend of the river. With no one to guide it, the current took the boat past us and, as quickly as it had come it was gone, drifting downstream.

I wonder where it ended up.

#11 Storm Warning

I’m joining Becky in her February Square Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules of the challenge are simple: most photos must be square and fit the theme word Odd, referencing one of these definitions: different to what is usual or expected, or strange; a number of items, with one left over as a remainder when divided by two; happening or occurring infrequently and irregularly, or occasionally; separated from a usual pair or set and therefore out of place or mismatched. Look for #SquareOdds.

While we didn’t travel as much as usual in 2021, we were fortunate to enjoy several holidays in our home state of Queensland and one short trip over the border in New South Wales. Join me this month in a retrospective look at the very odd year of 2021. 

Yetman NSW, February 2021

Our campsite on a property not far from Yetman was stunning. From the bank of the Macintyre River, we had gorgeous views over the water and across the paddocks.

On our first evening we were treated to a glorious sunset.

But those ominous clouds were a warning of what was to come later that night.

A wild storm passed directly overhead, with heavy rain and lightning strikes in the bush nearby. Thunder rumbled around us for hours. As we sheltered in our caravan, I tried to capture the extraordinary light show outside, as huge lightning bolts lit up our campsite.

Over and over again, the freakish display of natural power turned night into day

before fading away again in seconds.

We should have taken more notice of those clouds.

#10 Are We There Yet?

I’m joining Becky in her February Square Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules of the challenge are simple: most photos must be square and fit the theme word Odd, referencing one of these definitions: different to what is usual or expected, or strange; a number of items, with one left over as a remainder when divided by two; happening or occurring infrequently and irregularly, or occasionally; separated from a usual pair or set and therefore out of place or mismatched. Look for #SquareOdds.

While we didn’t travel as much as usual in 2021, we were fortunate to enjoy several holidays in our home state of Queensland and one short trip over the border in New South Wales. Join me this month in a retrospective look at the very odd year of 2021. 

Yetman NSW, February 2021

The general store in Yetman looks no different to any other store in a small country town. But the owner of this store has taken a novel approach to encouraging passing travellers to stop for a while.

The side wall of the store is covered by a quirky mural, with a fun play on words with the name of the town.

Did the shopkeeper’s strategy work? It did for us – we stopped to take photos and bought morning tea at the store. And we weren’t the only ones!

#7 At the Station

I’m joining Becky in her February Square Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules of the challenge are simple: most photos must be square and fit the theme word Odd, referencing one of these definitions: different to what is usual or expected, or strange; a number of items, with one left over as a remainder when divided by two; happening or occurring infrequently and irregularly, or occasionally; separated from a usual pair or set and therefore out of place or mismatched. Look for #SquareOdds.

While we didn’t travel as much as usual in 2021, we were fortunate to enjoy several holidays in our home state of Queensland and one short trip over the border in New South Wales. Join me this month in a retrospective look at the very odd year of 2021. 

Wallangarra QLD, February 2021

At first glance the railway station at Wallangarra, with its 19th century architecture and its red and cream paintwork, looks like any other country train station in Australia.

A closer inspection reveals some unconventional characteristics which make this station unique. While it’s not unusual for a station to have a platform on either side, at Wallangarra they have different roof styles.

The reason for this peculiar design goes back to the days before Federation, when there were six separate British colonies. Each was self-governed, with its own laws and taxes. Each had its own railway gauge and even the postage stamps were different.

Located on the Queensland/New South Wales border, the station at Wallangarra catered for trains from both colonies. Plaques on the platform tell the story.

When the building was constructed, the standard design for Queensland train station platforms was a curved bull nose roof while in New South Wales all the platforms had skillion roofs. The border between the two colonies bisected the platform so Wallangarra Railway Station was given one of each.

On the New South Wales side the wider gauge track heads south towards Tenterfield,

while the narrow gauge on the Queensland side marks the start of the journey to Brisbane.

A  national standard gauge track was introduced in the 1920s and a new railway line linking Kyogle in New South Wales to Brisbane in Queensland was built. While the Wallangarra line was no longer needed for interstate travel, the station was a vital transport link in the defence of Australia during World War Two.

The railway to Wallangarra continued to be used for freight services until the New South Wales line closed in 1988 and the Queensland line closed in 2007.

Today the heritage listed station houses a small museum and a café in the Railway Refreshment Rooms, with tables on both platforms. A traditional morning tea of fruit scones with jam and cream is too good to resist. The only question is, where will we eat it – in Queensland or in New South Wales?

Walking in the Clouds

Kind Squares Photo Challenge #14 ~ Queensland: One of a Kind

Destination: Springbrook National Park

With a name like “Best of All” this lookout promised much.

But cloud had enveloped the track, covering everything in a misty drizzle. We wondered if there would be anything to see at the end of the path.

Luckily the cloud lifted and the lookout lived up to its name. The views into northern New South Wales were the best!

This month I’m joining in every day with Becky’s October Kind Square Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: most photos must be square and fit the theme word “kind”. Look for #kindasquare.

Hidden Beauty

Australian Landscapes #32

Destination: Lockhart, New South Wales

Unlike the silos at Thallon or the water tower in Cunnamulla, the painted water tower in Lockhart takes some effort to find. For a start, Lockhart isn’t on any major roads so you’ll need to make a detour. And, once you’ve arrived in this small Riverina town, you’ll still need to search because the water tower is almost hidden by the trees in the garden around it.

But it’s worth looking for!

Located on the main street, the water tower was painted in 2018 by two Blue Mountains artists using freehand techniques and spray cans. The mural they created pays tribute to one of Australia’s most important resources – water. It depicts a waterfall tumbling over a rocky cliff before flowing down to a creek on the forest floor, giving sustenance to the plants and animals native to this area.

If you’re on the road in the Riverina district, look out for the turn off to Lockhart. The extra kilometres will be forgotten when you do find the water tower!

Cloud Shapes

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #27

Destination: Granite Lookout, Washpool National Park, New South Wales

The information board at the Granite Picnic Area promised us sweeping views of the Gibraltar Ranges.

We walked for 400 metres on a track shaded by eucaplypt forest,

until we came to a natural granite platform on the edge of the range, 1065 metres above sea level.

The huge slab of granite was perfectly positioned to see over the hidden gully where Coombadjha Creek flowed to the tree covered mountains beyond.

After walking through the forest with its branches arching overhead, the open sky was a welcome change.

We got all we were promised and more.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time. Also joining Jo’s Monday Walks.

A Natural Balancing Act

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #26

Destination: Stonehenge Recreational Reserve, New South Wales

At Stonehenge Recreational Reserve it looks like a giant tossed his pebble collection like a little boy tosses marbles. Beside the New England Highway not far from Glen Innes, dozens of huge granite boulders lie scattered across 32 hectares of parkland. Some are only just exposed, with most of their massive bulk still buried underground. Others rest on their side or stack up against each other.

Some boulders balance haphazardly in precarious positions,

while others seem perilously close to toppling.

When the first English settlers arrived here in 1838, they named their property “Stonehenge”. It’s not hard to imagine why.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.