Tag Archive | New South Wales

Goodbye Perth, Hello Sydney

Come with me on a train ride. We’ll travel 4,352 kilometres across Australia from east to west, spending four days and three nights on a train 731 metres long. We’ll start in Sydney and stay in Perth at the end and along the way we’ll traverse deserts, stop in a ghost town and cross the mighty Nullarbor Plain. Come with me on a transcontinental journey aboard the iconic Indian Pacific! 

Indian Pacific Adventure #19 Perth to Sydney

After travelling across Australia from Sydney to Perth on the Indian Pacific for four days, our return journey took just under five hours. 

We farewelled to the beautiful city of Perth on a mid-morning flight, 

passing over the vast expanse of the Nullarbor Plain we had crossed on the train. 

Our route took us over the coastline of the Great Australian Bight, where the icy waters of the Southern Ocean meet the spectacular Bunda Cliffs. 

We travelled forward by three hours, catching up with the setting sun over New South Wales,

before Sydney’s familiar landmarks finally came into view. 

Our fabulous transcontinental journey from Sydney to Perth and back again was over.

Linking to Becky’s November Walking Squares – even though there was no walking in these photos, we walked a lot that day; through two airport terminals, one train station and a car park!

Platform Walking

Come with me on a train ride. We’ll travel 4,352 kilometres across Australia from east to west, spending four days and three nights on a train 731 metres long. We’ll start in Sydney and stay in Perth at the end and along the way we’ll traverse deserts, stop in a ghost town and cross the mighty Nullarbor Plain. Come with me on a transcontinental journey aboard the iconic Indian Pacific! 

Indian Pacific Adventure #7 Broken Hill

After travelling westwards through the night we woke to a glorious sunrise. We’d crossed almost all of New South Wales while we slept and were heading towards Broken Hill.

Soon the mullock heaps of the famous mining town came into view. Our itinerary included a morning stop in Broken Hill with a visit to the Art Gallery, but the delay the previous day meant we could only stop for half an hour.

We’ve been to Broken Hill before so the change of plan wasn’t too disappointing. When the train pulled into the platform, all the passengers alighted for a chance to stretch their legs.

At 8 o’clock on a winter’s morning, the air was crisp and icy cold so our platform walk was brisk. We took a few quick photos and quickly went back on board.

The train was soon underway again and we passed the Miners’ Memorial on our way out of town. Our journey continued west across the vast desert plain towards the South Australian border.

Joining Becky for November Walking Squares

All Aboard!

Come with me on a train ride. We’ll travel 4,352 kilometres across Australia from east to west, spending four days and three nights on a train 731 metres long. We’ll start in Sydney and stay in Perth at the end and along the way we’ll traverse deserts, stop in a ghost town and cross the mighty Nullarbor Plain. Come with me on a transcontinental journey aboard the iconic Indian Pacific! 

Indian Pacific Adventure #6 On The Train

What do you do when the train can’t come to you? You go to the train on a bus of course!

The start of our journey on the Indian Pacific didn’t go according to plan. After torrential rain the week before, a massive land slip in the Blue Mountains closed the train line into Sydney. So instead of departing Central Station aboard the iconic train, we left in a convoy of buses.

Our disappointment at the change was short lived – the silver lining was that our route out of the city took us over the Harbour Bridge. We’ve never done that before!

During a short stop in Katoomba we enjoyed a beautiful winter sunset over the Blue Mountains. Finally we reached the train, which was waiting for us at Lithgow.

It wasn’t long before we were all aboard and ready for the adventure to begin.

Winter Garden

Come with me on a train ride. We’ll travel 4,352 kilometres across Australia from east to west, spending four days and three nights on a train 731 metres long. We’ll start in Sydney and stay in Perth at the end and along the way we’ll traverse deserts, stop in a ghost town and cross the mighty Nullarbor Plain. Come with me on a transcontinental journey aboard the iconic Indian Pacific! 

Indian Pacific Adventure #5 Chinese Garden of Friendship

There’s an element of surprise at the entrance of Sydney’s Chinese Garden of Friendship. Surrounded by the high rise office buildings of the city’s CBD, the forecourt offers glimpses of the calm space within.

The garden opened on 17 January, 1988 during Australia’s Bicentennial celebrations. Mosaic paved walking paths lead visitors on a circuit past 17 traditional pavilions and a serene lake complete with waterfalls and trickling brooks.

Both Chinese and Australian native plants fill the garden; mid-winter blooms add colour to the rich greenery.

We weren’t the only ones enjoying the garden on this sunny winter’s day.

Joining Becky for November Walking Squares

High Rise Views

Come with me on a train ride. We’ll travel 4,352 kilometres across Australia from east to west, spending four days and three nights on a train 731 metres long. We’ll start in Sydney and stay in Perth at the end and along the way we’ll traverse deserts, stop in a ghost town and cross the mighty Nullarbor Plain. Come with me on a transcontinental journey aboard the iconic Indian Pacific! 

Indian Pacific Adventure #4 Sydney Tower

At 309 metres, Sydney Tower is the tallest structure in Sydney and the second tallest observation tower in the southern hemisphere.

The day we travelled in the lift 250 metres up to the observation deck, known as Sydney Tower Eye, clouds drifted past at eye level. But we still had fabulous 360° views of the city and the harbour.

Skywalk offers visitors the opportunity to walk around the outside of the tower on a glass-floored outdoor platform.

I didn’t! Would you?

Joining Becky for November Walking Squares

The Best View at the Zoo

Come with me on a train ride. We’ll travel 4,352 kilometres across Australia from east to west, spending four days and three nights on a train 731 metres long. We’ll start in Sydney and stay in Perth at the end and along the way we’ll traverse deserts, stop in a ghost town and cross the mighty Nullarbor Plain. Come with me on a transcontinental journey aboard the iconic Indian Pacific! 

Indian Pacific Adventure #3 Taronga Zoo

Sydney’s famous Taronga Zoo, located at Bradleys Head, overlooks the city and beautiful Sydney Harbour. Visitors riding the Sky Safari cable car from the wharf to the top entrance are treated to spectacular views on the way.

The zoo, renowned for its conservation and preservation projects, wildlife research and education, has more than 5,000 animal residents living in scientifically curated geographic environments. Their accommodations are excellent, but which group of animals has the best view in the zoo?

The Bolivian squirrel monkeys spend their days darting through a tropical rainforest

while the koalas are happy to munch on gum leaves in the eucalypt trees.

Brightly coloured Gouldian finches perch on a branch in the aviary for just a few seconds before flying away again,

but ring-tailed lemurs and Sumatran tigers like to relax and soak up the winter sunshine.

The meerkats demonstrate their sunbathing techniques – first warm the front…

then warm the back…

before climbing up to see what everyone else is doing.

The chimpanzees like to climb high too.

The African lions and Asian elephants have glimpses of the city from their spacious enclosures.

But who does have the best view in the zoo?

Under The Bridge

Come with me on a train ride. We’ll travel 4,352 kilometres across Australia from east to west, spending four days and three nights on a train 731 metres long. We’ll start in Sydney and stay in Perth at the end and along the way we’ll traverse deserts, stop in a ghost town and cross the mighty Nullarbor Plain. Come with me on a transcontinental journey aboard the iconic Indian Pacific! 

Indian Pacific Adventure #2 Sydney Harbour Bridge

One of the most recognisable sights in Sydney is the famous Harbour Bridge, which spans the harbour from Dawes Point at The Rocks to Milsons Point on the lower North Shore. It’s often photographed from Circular Quay or out on the water.

Many visitors miss the opportunity to see the bridge from a completely different angle – they don’t know you can walk under the bridge.

Dawes Point Park, at the southern end of the bridge, is a heritage listed archaeological site. Excavations have revealed the remains of an observatory built in 1788 and the foundations of Dawes Point Battery structures dating from the early 1800s, including a guard house, officers’ quarters and store rooms.

Five cannons originally used at the Battery in the 1850s are located around the pylons of the bridge.

Next time you’re in Sydney, make sure you go for a walk under Sydney Harbour Bridge.

Joining Becky for November Walking Squares and Jo for Monday Walks

In Sydney

Come with me on a train ride. We’ll travel 4,352 kilometres across Australia from east to west, spending four days and three nights on a train 731 metres long. We’ll start in Sydney and stay in Perth at the end and along the way we’ll traverse deserts, stop in a ghost town and cross the mighty Nullarbor Plain. Come with me on a transcontinental journey aboard the iconic Indian Pacific! 

Indian Pacific Adventure #1 Sydney Harbour

You know you’re in Sydney when you see a ferry going past the Harbour Bridge,

and another sailing around the Opera House.

The best way to see all three is on a ferry ride on Sydney Harbour.

#14 River Secrets

I’m joining Becky in her February Square Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules of the challenge are simple: most photos must be square and fit the theme word Odd, referencing one of these definitions: different to what is usual or expected, or strange; a number of items, with one left over as a remainder when divided by two; happening or occurring infrequently and irregularly, or occasionally; separated from a usual pair or set and therefore out of place or mismatched. Look for #SquareOdds.

While we didn’t travel as much as usual in 2021, we were fortunate to enjoy several holidays in our home state of Queensland and one short trip over the border in New South Wales. Join me this month in a retrospective look at the very odd year of 2021. 

Lees Camping Reserve QLD/NSW Border, February 2021

Another campsite, another river; this time we free-camped off the grid at a reserve on the bank of the Dumaresq River, close to the state border.

While the river scenery was beautiful, it was the geological formations beside the water which intrigued us. Two distinctly different rock types lay side by side.

One was a conglomerate – hard, red and pockmarked with circular indentations. Hundreds of tiny pebbles were embedded in each white circle.

The other was softer. Sandstone-like, this layer was deeply eroded. Puddles were evidence of higher river levels at some earlier time.

If only the river was able to tell us the story of this perplexing landscape.

#13 Smoke Does Not Get In Your Eyes

I’m joining Becky in her February Square Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules of the challenge are simple: most photos must be square and fit the theme word Odd, referencing one of these definitions: different to what is usual or expected, or strange; a number of items, with one left over as a remainder when divided by two; happening or occurring infrequently and irregularly, or occasionally; separated from a usual pair or set and therefore out of place or mismatched. Look for #SquareOdds.

While we didn’t travel as much as usual in 2021, we were fortunate to enjoy several holidays in our home state of Queensland and one short trip over the border in New South Wales. Join me this month in a retrospective look at the very odd year of 2021. 

Yetman NSW, February 2021

What is this strange creature at our campsite?

While it looks like some alien robot has arrived from outer space, it’s actually a camping stove called a pig oven. Light a fire inside and soon you have warmth and heat to cook a meal or boil the kettle.

And best of all, the smoke goes up the tall chimney and blows away instead of into your eyes.