Tag Archive | #roadtrip

Looking Down, Not Up

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #13

Destination: Rocky Hill, Goulburn, New South Wales

High atop a hill overlooking the regional city of Goulburn stands an imposing stone tower. Built in the 1920s and paid for by public subscription, the tower is a war memorial honouring local men and women who served in World War One.

Inside the tower, the ground floor contains an honour roll and a flame of remembrance, while from the upstairs windows there are beautiful views of the city and the surrounding countryside.

I found it difficult to look up at the tower as we walked along the path.

After seeing these signs, I was too busy looking out for danger.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

Solitude

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #10

Destination: Port Stephens Region, New South Wales

Shoal Bay

Salamander Bay

Salamander Bay

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

Up, Down, Up

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #9

Destination: Tomaree Head, Shoal Bay, New South Wales

The sign said it was only a two kilometre walk, but it looked a long way up to the summit of Tomaree Head.

At first the track was easy going,

but soon the gentle incline was replaced by steps up to a cantilevered walkway leading through the trees and around the edge of the hill.

At the top our efforts were rewarded with expansive coastal views to the north and south.

Heading back downhill, we left the summit walk and turned onto another path. It led us up again to the Fort Tomaree gun emplacements, part of Australia’s coastal defences during the Second World War.

The guns were removed a long time ago, but the structures which housed them have been left behind.

It was easy to see why Tomaree Head was chosen as a strategic site. The views were spectacular.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time. Also joining Jo’s Monday Walks.

The Best Way to Ride

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #7

Destination: Stockton Sand Dunes, Port Stephens, New South Wales

When you first arrive at Stockton Sand Dunes, you could be forgiven for thinking you’d suddenly arrived in Egypt. The coastal vegetation is replaced by vast hills of pure white sand and a camel caravan passes a line of small pyramids bordering the dunes.

Covering 32 kilometres and reaching a height of more than 30 metres, the Stockton Sand Dunes are the largest in the southern hemisphere. The pyramids are relics of World War Two, part of a line of tank traps installed to protect Australia’s eastern coast from potential invaders. And the camels are one of the area’s most popular tourist attractions.

If camels don’t appeal there are other ways to enjoy the sand dunes. Four wheel drive vehicles and quad bikes are permitted on the dunes. Or just take a big piece of cardboard and make your own toboggan.

Cheap, easy and the most fun of all!

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

The Golden Hour

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #8

Destination: Shoal Bay, New South Wales

Sunset over the water isn’t a common sight on the east coast of Australia. When we’re in the right place at the right time, we always stop to enjoy the spectacle of this special golden hour.

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

Everything You Could Want

Square Perspectives Photo Challenge ~ Australian Landscapes #4

Destination: Murray’s Craft Brewing Co, Bobs Farm Port Stephens, New South Wales

When you’re hungry and thirsty, Murray’s Craft Brewing Co on Nelson Bay Road is the place to be.

There’s plenty of beer on tap, along with local wines created by Port Stephens Winery. The restaurant has an extensive menu and the servings are generous and delicious.

After your cravings have been satisfied there’s room out on the grass for a friendly game,

which is sure to leave you feeling thirsty again.

 

While our travel plans are on hold I’m joining in every day with Becky’s July Square Perspectives Photo Challenge over at The Life of B. The rules are simple: photos must be square and fit the theme of perspective. My posts represent the definition of perspective as a vista – seeing something over distance or time.

Perfect in Winter

Exploring Australia

It may be the middle of winter, but the day we visit Palm Beach the weather couldn’t be better. 

Unless you live in Sydney you may not be familiar with the Northern Beaches suburb of Palm Beach. But if you’re a fan of Australian television soap operas you’ll definitely have heard of its alter ego, Summer Bay. Palm Beach is the setting for the outdoor scenes of the TV show, Home and Away

Located on a narrow peninsula, Palm Beach is almost completely surrounded by water. On the eastern side is the famous beach featured on television, a 2.3 kilometre stretch of white sand edged by the Pacific Ocean. North of the peninsula is the wide expanse of Broken Bay while on the west is Pittwater, a deep and wide river estuary . 

We’re staying in Gosford on the northern side of Broken Bay, and the best way to travel to Palm Beach is on the local ferry.

From the terminal at Ettalong, the ferry sails into the open waters of Broken Bay. The half hour journey follows a clearly marked route between Box Head and Barrenjoey Headland. Even from a distance the Barrenjoey Lighthouse stands out high above the water on the headland. 

At Palm Beach the ferry docks at the pier alongside Pittwater Park. We’ve already decided to avoid the busy beach area popular with fans of the TV show; instead we stay on the quieter Pittwater side.

With freshly cooked fish and chips for lunch, we settle ourselves near the water’s edge. Children paddle in the shallows, sailboats at anchor gently rock in the tidal current and we just sit, enjoying the beautiful scenery. 

It’s the perfect way to spend a winter’s day.

 

Chocolate Heaven

Exploring Australia
Have you ever been able to enter a chocolate shop and walk out empty handed? No?
Me neither.
And when the shop is attached to a chocolate factory the temptation is even greater. Even those with the strongest willpower will find a purchase impossible to resist if they visit The Factory in the New South Wales coastal city of West Gosford.
In the large factory shop packets and boxes of chocolate, nougat and marshmallows are artfully stacked in tantalising displays.
Handmade confections named after iconic Australian places fill large glass cabinets.
Through the porthole windows between the shop and the factory floor visitors can see all these treats being made. I have to confess I’m too busy tasting free samples to take photos of the production line.
Luckily I remember to use my camera in the café, where the menu boasts five special hot chocolate creations.
A morsel of cake accompanies each drink, just enough to complement its rich flavours and decadent toppings. With such mouthwatering descriptions, it takes much longer to decide which to choose than it does to devour our treats when they arrive.
When afternoon tea is finished and we return to the shop, it’s even harder to select just a few favourites to take away.
I think I might need one of everything!

A Surprise Inside

Exploring Australia 

 The New England region of northern New South Wales is known for its brisk winters and, even though the sun is shining, we’re feeling the chill. A warming fire and a hot breakfast are our first priorities and at the Walcha Royal Cafe we find all that and more.

The original building on this site, the Royal Hotel, was constructed in 1889. When it burned down in 1938 another building, aptly named the New Royal Hotel, took its place. In 2006, with new owners and a new lease of life, the hotel became known as the Walcha Royal Cafe.

It may be cold out on the street, but inside a fire blazes in the wood-burning heater. The scent of freshly brewed coffee draws us in while an expansive choice of winter fare is enticing. But it isn’t the luxurious warmth of the fire or the tasty food that keeps us lingering after breakfast. 

The cafe particularly welcomes motorbike riders and is a well-known stop on journeys between the inland and the coast. Motorcycles are celebrated in every room, with memorabilia, old photographs and even a motorbike or two on display.

Quirky sculptures made from motorbike parts attract our attention. Some are whimsical creations

while others have a functional purpose.

With a warm welcome, delicious food and this wonderful collection the Walcha Royal Cafe has plenty to offer, whether you’re a dedicated motorbike enthusiast or a traveller just passing through.

A Loo With a View – The Western Queensland Edition

Western Queensland Road Trip #20

A road trip through the outback

is a marvellous affair.

You can drive for hours

and think the land is bare.

But if nature calls along the way

there’s no need for despair.

There are outback loos with outback views

and their own distinctive flair.

~

Often in the outback

it is very, very dry.

But some bush loos have water views.

You wouldn’t pass them by.

Warrego River at the Cunnamulla Weir

Moonie River, Nindigully

~

When Thomas Mitchell camped here in 1846

he had to bring his own facilities.

But now you’ll find this bathroom on the river bank –

it’s basic but it covers all your needs.

Maranoa River, Mitchell

~

When visiting a winery

a bathroom is essential.

And if it’s hidden in the garden

your visit’s confidential.

Riversands Winery, St George

~

But on a dusty bush track

where the toilet is a wreck,

privacy’s not guaranteed –

You may need to go low-tech!

More loos with beautiful views!

The original Loo With a View

Loos with views in Western Australia

The highest loo view in Australia

Loos with views around Australia

Loos with views – The Cruise Edition

Loos with views – The Hawaiian Edition

Loos with views – The English Edition

Loos with views – The Canadian Edition

Loos with views – The Kevtoberfest Edition

or just search #looswithviews